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The Pope is expected to name Archbishop Velasio DePaolis the Apostolic Delegate to the Legion of Christ.

The Archbishop of Canterbury and the Archbishop of York are reportedly preparing to make a last-ditch effort to prevent thousands of traditionalists leaving the Church of England.

The Vatican’s spokesman expressed “esteem and solidarity” with Cardinal Crescenzio Sepe yesterday as it emerged that police are investigating the Archbishop of Naples for alleged corruption.

Benedict XVI made an urgent appeal for peace in southern Kyrgyzstan and prayed for the world’s refugees after the Angelus on Sunday (full text, video).

Pope Benedict ordained 14 new priests for the Diocese of Rome in St Peter’s Basilica yesterday (hfull text).

A Vatican spokesman has denied reports that the disgraced former Archbishop of Poznań, Juliusz Paetz, is to be “rehabilitated”.

Zenit publishes the final part of Pope Benedict’s question-and-answer session with priests.

Fr Edward Daly welcomes the Saville report into Bloody Sunday.

Commonweal responds to criticism by the US bishops of its stance on the healthcare bill.

John Allen points out the “elephants in the room” of the Catholic debate on healthcare reform.

Kevin O’Rourke looks at “the complicated reasons behind an abortion at a Catholic hospital” in Phoenix.

George Weigel describes the alternative to “Catholic Lite”.

Karl Giberson urges Christians not to vilify the New Atheists.

Joanna Bogle profiles Catholic Voices, which aims to transform the media image of Catholicism during the Pope’s visit to Britain.

Austen Ivereigh applauds Archbishop Vincent Nichols’s efforts to promote the papal visit.

Rocco Palmo reports on the remarkable success of the iBreviary app for the iPhone.

And Fr Z wonders if the iPad will replace the altar missal.

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Cardinal Keith O’Brien has said that the crucifix is “not an imposition but an invitation” ahead of a ruling on its public display by the European Court of Human Rights.

Cardinal Marc Ouellet, the Archbishop of Quebec, is emerging as the new favourite to replace Cardinal Giovanni Battista Re as prefect of the Congregation for Bishops.

The Irish bishops have appealed for a free vote on the country’s civil partnership bill.

Auxiliary Bishop Gabino Zavala of Los Angeles says the US bishops are “very troubled” by some Catholic blogs.

Zenit publishes the third part of Pope Benedict’s question-and-answer session with priests.

James Preece wonders how much influence Archbishop Vincent Nichols will have over what the Pope says in Britain.

Cristina Odone says church schools could be key to reducing Britain’s teenage pregnancy rate.

And Archbishop Nichols says he doesn’t want to hear vuvuzelas during Pope Benedict’s visit to Britain.

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The Pope has accepted the resignation of Bishop John Magee of Cloyne, the personal secretary to three popes.

The Orange Order is opposing Pope Benedict’s trip to Britain in September.

An exhibition in New York will celebrate John Paul II’s relationship with the Jewish community.

Jesús Colina of Zenit examines the media coverage of Pope Benedict XVI’s letter to Irish Catholics.

Salon praises singer Sinead O’Connor for her 18-year battle against the papacy.

Fr James Martin SJ has his “feet held to the fire” by an Australian radio interviewer.

The New Yorker features the Benedictine Monastery of Norcia.

And CatholicTV, the American Catholic television network, is following James Cameron’s lead and broadcasting in 3D.

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The Pontifical Council for Culture is creating a foundation to focus on relations with atheists and agnostics.

Rome’s Evangelical Lutheran Church is preparing to welcome the Pope on March 14 (video).

The Italian bishops’ conference has issued a document calling for attention to the problems of the Mafia-dominated south of the country.

A French bishop has accused the civil authorities of responding with “ineptitude” to the desecration of a church in his diocese.

A Spanish priest who died celebrating Mass is to be beatified on April 25.

The Apostolic Nuncio to Iraq has decried the “endless” series of murders in Iraq.

Church leaders in South Korea have deplored a court ruling that the death penalty is constitutional.

The Brazilian Catholic Church is suing Columbia Pictures over its use of the Christ the Redeemer statue in the apocalypse film 2012.

The Friends of the Ordinariate (FOTO) website is now welcoming members of the Traditional Anglican Church/The Church of Ireland (Traditional Rite) and Roman Catholics.

Archbishop Timothy Dolan has given a revealing television interview in which he discusses potholes on Madison Avenue, John O’Connor, dog breeds, sledgehammers, St Patrick’s Day and his own weight.

Canadian Catholics seem less divided over the new English translation of the Roman Missal than Americans, says Deborah Gyapong.

The director of the St Dominic’s Institute in Rome discusses the role of Muslims in Catholic schools.

George Sim Johnston explains why Vatican II was necessary.

Law professor Brian Scarnecchia discusses the “absurd fate” of frozen human embryos.

Zenit publishes Pope Benedict’s meditation for Rome’s priests (part one and part two).

Fr Robert Barron explains how Catholics can overcome “internet superficiality“.

The Dominican Sisters of Mary have taught talkshow host Oprah Winfrey to pray the rosary.

And Fr James Martin SJ explains why he’s tiring of the comedian Sarah Silverman.

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Fr Tim Finigan asks whether Catholic state education in Britain has entered its “endgame”. Damian Thompson, John Smeaton, Mulier Fortis, St Mary Magdalen, and Sunday Morning Soapbox also reflect on the latest developments in the battle over sex education.

Forward in Faith UK is supporting a Day of Prayer today, the feast of the Chair of St Peter, in response to Anglicanorum Coetibus. Thinking Anglicans rounds up the latest developments. And Christian Campbell says that, despite claims to the contrary, groups of Anglicans around the world are preparing to respond to the Pope’s offer.

Two of the Vatican’s most senior officials have raised the issue of reducing the number of dioceses in Ireland.

Pope Benedict XVI began his traditional Lenten retreat on Sunday evening (audio). Shortly before, he gave the Angelus address in which he compared Lent to “a long retreat” (video).

Pope Benedict has confirmed that he will visit a Lutheran church in Rome next month.

The Pope has not yet received a letter from members of the Pontifical Academy for Life criticising their president, Archbishop Rino Fisichella.

The Guardian suggests that the Pope has condemned intrusive body scanners at airports.

No Hidden Magenta wonders if Europe is heading for its own Roe vs Wade.

Australian and Quebec will gain their first saints on October 17 (video).

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago will speak at Brigham Young University tomorrow on the topic “Catholics and Latter-day Saints: Partners in the Defence of Religious Freedom”.

A Marian statue damaged during the atomic bombing of Nagasaki will meet its counterpart in Guernica as part of a “peace pilgrimage” marking the 65th anniversary of the bombing.

America magazine examines the trends in the latest Annuario Pontificio and Rocco Palmo notes that the Catholic Church in America is still growing.

Robbers have shot dead a priest in Mexico.

The BBC reports that a monastery near Vienna is offering men the chance to “be a monk for a weekend“.

Bishop Thomas Tobin of Providence, Rhode Island, asks whether John Paul II was “crazy or holy“.

Zenit meets the Polish twin brothers who both felt called to the priesthood in the Salesian order.

And Da Mihi Animas marvels at the skills of the skateboarding friar (video).

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Rocco Palmo applauds the appointment of a woman, Dr Flaminia Giovanelli, to a high-ranking post in the Roman Curia.

Pope Benedict XVI gave the traditional blessing of lambs on the feast of St Agnes yesterday (video here).

Cardinal Bertone will remain in his post as Vatican Secretary of State even though he has reached the age of retirement.

Giles Pinnock reports on the funeral Mass of Mgr Graham Leonard, the former Anglican Bishop of London.

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, speaks to Vatican Radio about the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity (audio).

The Bishop of Winchester, the Rt Rev Michael Scott-Joynt, has described the Equality Bill as “irrational and ignorant”.

As many as 30 seminarians were killed in the Haiti earthquake, Zenit reports.

Fr David Jaeger gives an insight into the delicate state of relations between Israel and the Holy See.

William Saletan uncovers the practice of sex-selection abortion in the United States.

The Mirror of Justice has begun its discussion of John Allen’s important new book The Future Church.

And American bishop who is due for retirement has earned the ultimate accolade: he has become a bobblehead.

Eight religious offer sanctuary to hundreds of fleeing Angolans

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This isn’t going to generate front-page headlines, but the Church in Angola is engaged in a dramatic struggle to provide for refugees forced to leave their homes in the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Republic of Congo.

Zenit reports:

Four Franciscan Capuchins and four Sisters of Mercy in Damba are aiding the homeless Angolans, taking them into the convent and giving them care.

[Aid to the Church in Need representative] Fr Halemba affirmed: ‘The Sisters are helping as much as they can. They are taking people in, distributing food, utensils, nappies, medicines and clothing; they are making sure that the refugees are vaccinated against tetanus, polio and other diseases and trying to provide spiritual and psychological support to the suffering.’

Many volunteers are coming from the parishes to help serve hundreds every day, but the stream of refugees continues to grow.

Aid to the Church in Need reports that some 40,000 Angolans have been expelled from the Congo over the past few weeks as an “act of revenge” for Angola’s expulsion of Congolese refugees.

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Written by Luke Coppen

November 24, 2009 at 2:04 pm