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Posts Tagged ‘Traditional Anglican Communion

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The Traditional Anglican Communion has requested a Personal Ordinariate in the United Kingdom.

Irish children are safer today in the Catholic Church than before, Cardinal Seán Brady has said.

BP has donated $1 million to a Catholic charity helping fishermen affected by the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico.

The National Museum of Catholic Art and History in New York has been forced to close.

Mgr Guido Marini has celebrated Mass ad orientem in the Roman Basilica of St Mary Major.

George Weigel says American Catholics have arrived a critical moment in their history.

Michael Sean Winters argues that Pope Benedict is “emphatically is not looking for a culture war”.

George Anderson SJ is dismayed by France’s ban on the burqa.

Fr James Martin SJ is outraged by James Carroll’s attack on priestly celibacy.

Theologian Tina Beattie argues that the bishops are “the most brutal and ignorant of moral dictators“.

Marcel LeJeune lists his 50 favourite saints’ quotations.

And Fr Tim Finigan reports on a go-kart competition for French priests.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster has set out the key themes of the pre-election document of the Bishops of England and Wales (video, audio, photos).

Benedict XVI reflected on his hero St Bonaventure at the general audience yesterday (video, full text).

Archbishop Mauro Piacenza, secretary of the Congregation for Clergy, has written a letter to the world’s priests (full text).

A Spanish exorcist has denied claims that there are Satanists in the Roman Curia.

The Vatican Television Centre will begin broadcasting in high definition from October.

The Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines has called for a ban on condom advertisements in public places.

Lebanon’s Maronite bishops have appealed for a national dialogue to address the country’s divisions.

The Traditional Anglican Communion has formally requested a Personal Ordinariate for the United States.

New Mexico’s Catholic bishops are not happy with a new food tax which they say penalises the poor.

The Guardian picks up on a new campaign to highlight the racist origins of the abortion movement.

Ignatius Insight publishes the article that was too edgy for the Notre Dame Observer.

No Hidden Magenta says the fuss about the US bishops’ revised guidelines on artificial nutrition and hydration is “much ado about nothing“.

Paul Lauritzen interviews Vatican stargazer Brother Guy Consolmagno (audio).

Carl Olson ponders the difference between atheists and liberal Anglicans.

Anthony Stevens-Arroyo identifies two different types of American bishop.

A website offers a new way to experience the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem (video).

And Danielle Bean wonders if full body scans are really an affront to modesty.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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The Society for the Protection of Unborn Children (SPUC) is urging Catholics to ask their MPs to support an amendment to the Government’s sex education Bill, which is debated today.

The head of one of Scotland’s leading Catholic schools has said it is painful that a joined-up “Catholic world” of school, parish and home no longer exists.

The Bishop of Funchal has called for prayers following the devastating floods in Madeira.

The Toronto Apostolate of the Priestly Fraternity of St Peter (FSSP) will come to an abrupt end next Sunday.

The Traditional Anglican Communion in Central America has endorsed the Apostolic Constitution Anglicanorum Coetibus.

A bishop has called on Islamist terrorists in the Philippines to spare civilians.

Benedict XVI has written to the Brazilian bishops encouraging them to free people from slavery to money.

The Pope and the Roman Curia began their Lenten retreat with Eucharistic exposition and the celebration of Vespers (official video, Rome Reports video).

An exhibition focusing on John Paul II’s suffering has opened at the Vatican (video).

A Jesuit priest is to celebrate Mass in the Extraordinary Form at Fordham University Church.

Ana Roco Castro suggests 18 ways in which Catholics can use social media for evangelisation.

Richard Schickel of Vanity Fair explores the Catholic subtext of Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull.

And the Curt Jester suggests an alternative cover design for L’Osservatore Romano.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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The bishops of El Salvador are pressing Pope Benedict XVI to canonise Oscar Romero.

The Anglo-Catholic blog has published the full text of the Traditional Anglican Communion’s 2007 petition to the Holy See.

Terry Sanderson urges secularists to “man the barricades” following the defeat of the Government over the Equality Bill.

Pianist Stephen Hough ponders the revelation that Pope John Paul II mortified himself with a whip.

The chairman of the House Pro-Life Caucus has accused President Obama of being “obsessed with promoting abortion”.

And Kevin Clarke writes about the latest twist in the saga of the Apostolic Visitation of US women religious.

Written by Luke Coppen

January 27, 2010 at 11:54 am

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Photo: Benedict XVI is seen during his visit to Rome’s synagogue yesterday (AP Photo/ Osservatore Romano, Ho)

This is what Pope Benedict XVI said during his visit to Rome’s Great Synagogue yesterday. John Allen provides analysis, while the New York Times asks whether Pius XII was a saint.

Archbishop John Hepworth, Primate of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC), has released details of his correspondence with Cardinal William Levada, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, concerning Anglicanorum coetibus, and says the TAC will respond formally to the Pope’s offer at Eastertide.

Meanwhile, America magazine has named the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, the winner of its Campion Award.

Cardinal Christoph Schönborn has issued a qualified apology to Bishop Ratko Perić of Mostar-Duvno following his controversial visit to Medjugorje.

The New York Times reports on yesterday’s Mass outside Port-au-Prince’s ruined cathedral. Meanwhile, Richard Dawkins doesn’t want believers to get the credit for helping Haitians following the devastating earthquake.

Cardinal Roger Etchegaray has finally left hospital after breaking his hip in the Midnight Mass incident in St Peter’s Basilica.

Peter Steinfels pays tribute to the late theologian Edward Schillebeeckx.

Charlotte Allen argues that, following the deaths of Schillebeeckx and Mary Daly, the flame of Catholic dissent is dying out.

The University of Notre Dame is once again at the centre of controversy after its student-run newspaper published an anti-gay cartoon.

Michael Sean-Winters challenges Archbishop Raymond Burke’s assessment of America (the archbishop’s full homily is here).

Pastor in Valle says Pope Benedict has transformed Rome.

You can find out what the Pope is doing for the next three months here.

And Fr Dwight Longenecker explains why Catholic churches should be tall.

Archbishop Hepworth: This is an act of great goodness

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This just in. Archbishop John Hepworth, primate of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC), has issued the following statement:

I have spent this evening speaking to bishops, priests and lay people of the Traditional Anglican Communion in England, Africa, Australia, India, Canada, the United States and South America.

We are profoundly moved by the generosity of the Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI. He offers in this Apostolic Constitution the means for ‘former Anglicans to enter into the fullness of communion with the Catholic Church’. He hopes that we can ‘find in this canonical structure the opportunity to preserve those Anglican traditions precious to us and consistent with the Catholic faith’. He then warmly states ‘we are happy that these men and women bring with them their particular contributions to our common life of faith’.

May I firstly state that this is an act of great goodness on the part of the Holy Father. He has dedicated his pontificate to the cause of unity. It more than matches the dreams we dared to include in our petition of two years ago. It more than matches our prayers. In those two years, we have become very conscious of the prayers of our friends in the Catholic Church. Perhaps their prayers dared to ask even more than ours.

While we await the full text of the Apostolic Constitution, we are also moved by the pastoral nature of the Notes issued today by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith. My fellow bishops have indeed signed the Catechism of the Catholic Church and made a statement about the ministry of the Bishop of Rome, reflecting the words of Pope John Paul II in his letter “Ut Unum Sint”.

Other Anglican groups have indicated to the Holy See a similar desire and a similar acceptance of Catholic faith. As Cardinal Levada has indicated, this response to Anglican petitions is to be of a global character. It will now be for these groups to forge a close cooperation, even where they transcend the existing boundaries of the Anglican Communion.

Fortunately, the Statement issued by the Archbishop of Canterbury reflects the understanding that we have gained from him that he does not stand in our way, and understands the decisions that we have reached. Both his reaction and our petition are fruits of a century of prayer for Christian unity, a cause that many times must have seemed forlorn. We now express our gratitude to Archbishop Williams, and have regularly assured him of our prayers. The See of Augustine remains a focus of our pilgrim way, as it was in ages of faith in the past.

I have made a commitment to the Traditional Anglican Communion that the response of the Holy See will be taken to each of our National Synods. They have already endorsed our pathway. Now the Holy See challenges us to seek in the specific structures that are now available the “full, visible unity, especially Eucharistic communion”, for which we have long prayed and about which we have long dreamed. That process will begin at once.

In the Anglican Office of Morning Prayer, the great Hymn of Thanksgiving, the Te Deum, is part of the daily Order. It is with heartfelt thanks to Almighty God, the Lord and Source of all peace and unity, that the hymn is on our lips today. This is a moment of grace, perhaps even a moment of history, not because the past is undone, but because the past is transformed.

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Written by Luke Coppen

October 20, 2009 at 5:11 pm

Breaking news: Traditional Anglicans to be reunited with Rome

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So, as expected, this morning the Vatican has unveiled the mechanism by which traditionalist Anglicans can be received as a group into the Catholic Church.

The provision is much more far-reaching than previously expected. Rather than creating a personal prelature for the Traditional Anglican Communion, along the lines of Opus Dei, the Pope has decided to establish “personal ordinariates”, along the lines of military ordinariates, which could potentially serve all former Anglicans, both clergy and lay.

Disaffected Anglicans must now approach the Holy See, expressing their desire to take up the provision. The Holy See will then contact the local bishops’ conference to discuss whether it is possible to create the personal ordinariate.

Referring to an Apostolic Constitution to be released shortly in Rome, Cardinal Levada, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, outlined the process that will allow former Anglicans to enter full communion corporately while retaining elements of the Anglican tradition.

The CDF said:

In this Apostolic Constitution the Holy Father has introduced a canonical structure that provides for such corporate reunion by establishing Personal Ordinariates, which will allow former Anglicans to enter full communion with the Catholic Church while preserving elements of the distinctive Anglican spiritual and liturgical patrimony. Under the terms of the Apostolic Constitution, pastoral oversight and guidance will be provided for groups of former Anglicans through a Personal Ordinariate, whose Ordinary will usually be appointed from among former Anglican clergy.

The forthcoming Apostolic Constitution provides a reasonable and even necessary response to a world-wide phenomenon, by offering a single canonical model for the universal Church which is adaptable to various local situations and equitable to former Anglicans in its universal application. It provides for the ordination as Catholic priests of married former Anglican clergy. Historical and ecumenical reasons preclude the ordination of married men as bishops in both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. The Constitution therefore stipulates that the Ordinary can be either a priest or an unmarried bishop. The seminarians in the Ordinariate are to be prepared alongside other Catholic seminarians, though the Ordinariate may establish a house of formation to address the particular needs of formation in the Anglican patrimony. In this way, the Apostolic Constitution seeks to balance on the one hand the concern to preserve the worthy Anglican liturgical and spiritual patrimony and, on the other hand, the concern that these groups and their clergy will be integrated into the Catholic Church…

The provision of this new structure is consistent with the commitment to ecumenical dialogue, which continues to be a priority for the Catholic Church, particularly through the efforts of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity.

In London, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, and Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster issued a joint statement on the move.

It said:

Today’s announcement of the Apostolic Constitution is a response by Pope Benedict XVI to a number of requests over the past few years to the Holy See from groups of Anglicans who wish to enter into full visible communion with the Roman Catholic Church, and are willing to declare that they share a common Catholic faith and accept the Petrine ministry as willed by Christ for his Church.

Pope Benedict XVI has approved, within the Apostolic Constitution, a canonical structure that provides for Personal Ordinariates, which will allow former Anglicans to enter full communion with the Catholic Church while preserving elements of distinctive Anglican spiritual patrimony.

The announcement of this Apostolic Constitution brings to an end a period of uncertainty for such groups who have nurtured hopes of new ways of embracing unity with the Catholic Church. It will now be up to those who have made requests to the Holy See to respond to the Apostolic Constitution.

The Apostolic Constitution is further recognition of the substantial overlap in faith, doctrine and spirituality between the Catholic Church and the Anglican tradition. Without the dialogues of the past forty years, this recognition would not have been possible, nor would hopes for full visible unity have been nurtured. In this sense, this Apostolic Constitution is one consequence of ecumenical dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion.

The on-going official dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion provides the basis for our continuing cooperation. The Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) and International Anglican Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission (IARCCUM) agreements make clear the path we will follow together.

With God’s grace and prayer we are determined that our on-going mutual commitment and consultation on these and other matters should continue to be strengthened. Locally, in the spirit of IARCCUM, we look forward to building on the pattern of shared meetings between the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales and the Church of England’s House of Bishops with a focus on our common mission. Joint days of reflection and prayer were begun in Leeds in 2006 and continued in Lambeth in 2008, and further meetings are in preparation. This close cooperation will continue as we grow together in unity and mission, in witness to the Gospel in our country, and in the Church at large.

Ruth Gledhill has a copy of a letter Dr Williams has sent to his fellow C of E bishops. He says:

I am sorry that there has been no opportunity to alert you earlier to this; I was informed of the planned announcement at a very late stage, and we await the text of the Apostolic Constitution itself and its code of practice in the coming weeks…

It remains to be seen what use will be made of this provision, since it is now up to those who have made requests to the Holy See to respond to the Apostolic Constitution; but, in the light of recent discussions with senior officials in the Vatican, I can say that this new possibility is in no sense at all intended to undermine existing relations between our two communions or to be an act of proselytism or aggression. It is described as simply a response to specific enquiries from certain Anglican groups and individuals wishing to find their future within the Roman Catholic Church.

Vatican-watcher John Allen says the announcement will have far-reaching implications:

In a move with potentially sweeping implications for relations between the Catholic church and some 80 million Anglicans worldwide, the Vatican has announced the creation of new ecclesiastical structures to absorb disaffected Anglicans wishing to become Catholics. The structures will allow those Anglicans to hold onto their distinctive spiritual practices, including the ordination of married former Anglican clergy as Catholic priests…

According to a Vatican “note” released this morning, married men may serve as priests in the new ordinariates, but they may not be ordained as bishops. The details will be presented in a new apostolic constitution from Pope Benedict XVI, expected to be issued shortly.
The Vatican note described the new “personal ordinariates” as similar to the structures created throughout the world to provide pastoral care for members of the military and their families. The structures are, in effect, non-territorial dioceses, provided over by a bishop and with their own priests and seminarians.

A personal ordinariate is also similar to the canonical status of “personal prelature,” currently held by only one Catholic group: Opus Dei.

The note said the ordinariates will be created in consultation with the national bishops’ conference of a given country.

Bishop John Broadhurst and Fr Geoffrey Kirk of Forward in Faith UK, an Anglican grouping opposed to women priests and bishops, say:

It has been the frequently expressed hope and fervent desire of Anglican Catholics to be enabled by some means to enter into full communion with the See of Peter whilst retaining in its integrity every aspect of their Anglican inheritance which is not at variance with the teaching of the Catholic Church.

We rejoice that the Holy Father intends now to set up structures within the Church which respond to this heartfelt longing. Forward in Faith has always been committed to seeking unity in truth and so warmly welcomes these initiatives as a decisive moment in the history of the Catholic Movement in the Church of England. Ut unum sint!

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, says:

Today the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has received word of the new Provision in the form of an apostolic constitution issued by the Holy See for the reception into full communion with the Catholic Church of groups from the Anglican tradition. The USCCB stands ready to collaborate in the implementation of that Provision in our country.

This step by the Holy See is in response to a number of requests received in Rome from groups of Anglicans seeking corporate reunion. The application of the new Provision recognises the desire of some Anglicans (Episcopalians) to live the Catholic faith in full, visible communion with the See of Peter, while at the same time retaining some elements of their traditions of liturgy, spirituality and ecclesial life which are consistent with the Catholic faith.

This Provision, at the service of the unity of the Church, calls us as well to join our voices to the Priestly Prayer of Jesus that ‘all may be one’ (Jn 17:21) as we seek a greater communion with all our brothers and sisters with whom we share Baptism. For 45 years, our Episcopal Conference has engaged in ecumenical dialogue with The Episcopal Church, which is the historic Province of the Anglican communion in North America. The Catholic Bishops of the United States remain committed to seeking deeper unity with the members of The Episcopal Church by means of theological dialogue and collaboration in activities that advance the mission of Christ and the welfare of society.

Photo: The Archbishop of Canterbury and the Archbishop of Westminster at this morning’s press conference (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

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Written by Luke Coppen

October 20, 2009 at 10:35 am