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Posts Tagged ‘Ross Douthat

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Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster has urged Catholics to get behind the papal visit to Britain.

Cardinal Francis George, President of US Conference of Catholic Bishops, has said Sister Carol Keehan and her colleagues “are to blame” for the passage of the healthcare bill in March. John Allen offers analysis.

Pope Benedict insisted again that faith “protects reason from every temptation to mistrust its own capacities” at his general audience yesterday (full text).

The Apostolic Nuncio to Kyrgyzstan has described the fighting in the country as an “absolute catastrophe”.

Apostolic visitors have toured 35 US female religious communities so far and have 80 to go.

Scientists claim to have solved the mystery of Caravaggio’s death.

Cuban blogger Yoani Sanchez assesses the rise of the Catholic Church in the country.

A Reuters blogger feels uneasy about the Pope’s visit to Britain.

Fr Christopher Phillips considers whether papal infallibility will prove an obstacle to the success of Anglicanorum coetibus.

Matthew Warner asks if we need a new apologetics after Vatican II.

And Ross Douthat wonders if the Catholic Church is finished.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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On the third day of his four-day visit, Pope Benedict XVI celebrated Mass at the shrine of Our Lady of Fátima, addressed charity workers and met the Portuguese bishops. His visit concludes today with Mass in Porto and a farewell speech before he flies back to Rome.

Fr Federico Lombardi says he is surprised by the number of people turning out to see the Pope in Portugal.

The BBC reports that businesses affected by the papal Mass at Coventry Airport in September have been told they will not get compensation.

Rome Reports speaks to Sister Bernadette Sangma who is raising awareness of human trafficking at next month’s World Cup (video).

Archbishop Timothy Dolan of New York says he was filled with “dread and revulsion” when he saw the head of Our Lady of Nagasaki.

Andrew Brown of the Guardian says this is turning out to be a “very much less conservative papacy than anyone expected”.

Ross Douthat of the New York Times demands the resignation of Cardinal Angelo Sodano.

William Donohue, president of the Catholic League for Religious and Civil Rights, responds to his critics at the National Catholic Reporter.

And Greg Burke marvels at the wax body parts on sale in Fátima.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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The Vatican Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments is to issue its formal approval of the new English translation of the complete Roman Missal later today.

The notorious Foreign Office memo mocking Pope Benedict XVI is now online, as is the “stakeholder positioning chart“. The official responsible for the memo has reportedly gone into hiding.

Cardinal William Levada has defended the Vatican’s response to the abuse crisis in an interview with PBS (full transcript).

Catholicism is up by 33 per cent in Africa and 16 per cent in Asia, USA Today reports.

The US bishops have condemned Arizona’s “draconian” new immigration law.

The province of Ontario is offering funding to help Catholic schools develop their own sex education course, following a clash with the Church.

Jesuit Fr Francis Xavier Dumortier is the new rector of the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.

The leader of the Taizé community has presented Pope Benedict with a Chinese Bible.

Norway’s Catholic Church has been informed of seven new possible cases of paedophilia by priests.

The New York Times profiles Jeffrey Anderson, the lawyer suing the Vatican.

Ross Douthat says the spate of episcopal resignations are good for the Church.

And Ashley Makar explains what the microbial biology of cheese has to do with Benedictine spirituality.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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The Bishops of England and Wales have issued a “direct and unambiguous” statement condemning clerical abuse and inviting Catholics to “make the four Fridays in May special days of prayer”.

Pope Benedict XVI has accepted the resignation of the Bishop of Kildare.

The Bishops of England and Wales have been discussing Britain’s controversial equality laws at their plenary session in Leeds (audio).

Cardinal Darío Castrillón Hoyos has decided not to celebrate a Pontifical Solemn High Mass in Washington DC after complaints from abuse victims.

A Portuguese bishop who will host the Pope next month in his diocese says Benedict XVI has been “tireless in the analysis and correction of abuses“.

The Swiss television channel TSR has removed cartoons satirising the abuse scandal from the internet after a complaint from the Church.

Archbishop Celestino Migliore has addressed the UN Economic and Social Council on the rights of indigenous people.

The Houston Press profiles Daniel Shea, “the man who sued the Pope“.

George Weigel has written an open letter to Hans Küng, demanding that the dissident theologian apologise to Benedict XVI for comments in his open letter to the world’s bishops.

Ross Douthat says the Vatican made a crucial early mistake in its response to questions about Pope Benedict’s handling of abuse cases.

Fr John Zuhlsdorf wonders if there’s something missing from the reports about Cardinal Castrillón’s now notorious letter to a French bishop.

Fr James Martin SJ has taken part in a Bloggingheads.tv debate about priestly celibacy.

And eCanadaNow asks the burning question: “Is the Pope sleep-deprived?

Morning Catholic must-reads

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In an oblique response to the abuse crisis, Pope Benedict has announced that he will dedicate his Easter weekly general audiences to the priesthood (video).

The Vatican confirmed yesterday that Fr Jerzy Popiełuszko, the Solidarity priest and martyr, will be beatified on June 6 in Marshal J Pilsudski Square in Warsaw.

Mexico City churches have reported a surge in Mass-goers during Holy Week.

Ross Douthat goes another round with Christopher Hitchens over the Pope and the abuse scandal.

Fr Joseph Fessio SJ defends the future Pope’s handling of the Kiesle case (video).

Paolo Rodari reports that the Vatican’s English Twitter feed is far more popular than those of other languages.

Thinking Faith salutes Robert Parsons, “the exemplar of the sinister Jesuit of popular imagination”, who died 400 years ago today.

Rod Dreher wonders if our minds are hard-wired for God.

Rob Vischer asks why senior Church officials are so gaffe-prone.

Andrew Sullivan suggests that new Catholic churches should look like Apple stores.

Catholic blogger Mark Shea wonders if the internet is making our manners coarser.

And, in response to the “12 evilest Pope pictures” meme, Anna Arco presents the “12 sweetest Pope pictures“. E D Kain applauds.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Benedict XVI returned from Castel Gandolfo for a few hours yesterday to address more than 21,000 pilgrims in St Peter’s Square (video).

Cardinal Sodano has given an interview to L’Osservatore Romano explaining why he made an outspoken defence of the Pope on Easter Sunday.

The New York Times reports on a bishop in Norway who resigned in May after admitting he had abused a boy.

NPR investigates whether the Vatican can be sued in US courts.

Rome Reports defends Benedict XVI’s record on battling sex abuse in the Church (video).

George Weigel attempts to separate truth from falsehood in the abuse scandal.

AP suggests that future popes will be closely vetted following the crisis.

The Pew Research Centre finds that Protestants are more critical than Catholics of the Pope’s handling of the crisis.

The wrong actions of some do not justify the vilification of all, Archbishop Donald Wuerl argues in the Washington Post.

Sholto Byrnes of the New Statesman wonders what has happened to the Catholic Church he grew up in.

Austen Ivereigh is shocked by claims that the Legion of Christ bribed senior Vatican cardinals. His colleague, Michael Sean Winters, isn’t.

Tim Drake speculates on Archbishop Gomez’s priorities as the future head of Los Angeles archdiocese.

Kathryn Jean Lopez clashes with Maureen Dowd over the status of women in the Church.

Ross Douthat wonders why the number of Americans who believe in the Resurrection is falling.

And Westminster Auxiliary Bishop George Stack gives the thumbs up to a new film about a Carmelite community in London.

Today’s Catholic must-reads

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The National Catholic Reporter claims that the Legion of Christ regularly gave ‘bribes’ to three senior Vatican cardinals at the behest of their founder.

The Daily Telegraph reports that Hitler “wanted to steal” the Turin Shroud.

The New York Times says the Vatican’s bureaucracy is struggling to cope with the abuse crisis.

Ross Douthat suggests that “the post-scandal Catholic Church may end up more Rome-centric than ever”.

Joaquin Navarro-Valls has written a robust defence of the Pope.

A rabbi has called the media coverage of the Church abuse scandal “one-dimensional“.

Bishop William Lori says we should be thanking the Pope “for helping the Church confront this crisis in a way that benefits victims“.

Jason Berry assesses Cardinal Levada’s role in the Vatican’s “risky strategy against the media”.

Leonard Klein, a married Catholic priest, asks: “What can the Catholic Church learn from married priests?“.

And Andrew M Brown hails “a wonderful film that shows what the Catholic Church does best”.