Editor's Briefing

Luke Coppen's Catholic Herald Blog

Posts Tagged ‘National Secular Society

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

More than 150,000 people from all over Italy flocked to St Peter’s Square on Sunday to express their solidarity with Benedict XVI.

Spanish prime minister José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero will visit the Pope in June.

An Irish bishop has urged Archbishop Diarmuid Martin of Dublin to clarify his claim that “strong forces” in the Church want abuse cases to remain hidden.

A 12-man British police delegation was in Portugal last week to assess how to protect Pope Benedict during his visit to Britain.

People who live or work near Coventry Airport may be issued with access permits during the Pope’s visit in September, local police have said.

Cardinal Pell has downplayed suggestions that he will serve as the prefect of the Congregation for Bishops.

Cardinal Marc Ouellet of Quebec has clashed with local politicians over abortion.

Americans aged between 18 and 29 are increasingly opposed to abortion, a Gallup analysis has found.

The Vatican has signed a mobile phone agreement with Vodafone.

Scholars have met in Rome to discuss “the contribution of Christianity to representative government” (audio).

The Cardinal Newman Society unveils a list of the most controversial speakers at US Catholic colleges in 2010.

Cardinal Seán O’Malley of Boston reports on his first visit to Ave Maria University’s campus in Florida.

John Allen analyses why Pope Benedict may have had difficulty defending himself at the height of the abuse crisis.

Fr Anthony Chadwick says the future liturgy of Personal Ordinariates should be the Sarum Use.

Fr Seán Finnegan asks why bishops can sometimes seem to be uncharitable.

English parish priest Fr Ray Blake says he’s decided to use the new English translation of the Mass straight away.

The Irish Catholic newspaper mourns its long-serving columnist Fr Martin Tierney.

And the National Secular Society appeals for victims of clerical abuse to appear at protests during the Pope’s visit to Britain.

Advertisements

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

The patriarch of the Syriac Catholic Church has accused Iraqi authorities of complicity in the murder of Christians in Mosul.

A thousand Christians are leaving the Holy Land every year, says Rome Reports (video).

Spiegel Online says Christians are the most persecuted people in the world.

Spain’s bishops have described a radical liberalisation of the country’s abortion law as “a step backward“.

Two years after World Youth Day, Sydney is seeing an upsurge in vocations and ordinations.

The next consistory to create new cardinals may take place in November.

Fr John Zuhlsdorf says the long-awaited “Instruction” on Summorum Pontificum may be imminent.

The campaign to delay the new English translation of the Mass has attracted more than 17,000 signatures.

The National Secular Society continues to fume about the Pope’s visit to Britain.

Three English bishops are taking the fight to save their adoption agencies to the High Court.

The election advice of the bishops of England and Wales will be published this week (previews here and here).

Hundreds of people have attended a national congress in London for Catholics working with young people (photos).

An Irish bishop has said he was embarrassed to kiss the Pope’s ring during the Vatican abuse summit.

The Pope has ended his “profound” week-long Lenten retreat (video).

Hundreds of Polish Catholics are converting to Judaism, says the New York Times.

Archbishop Dolan of New York has given another major television interview (video).

Hugh McLoughlin responds to those who suggest that Pope Benedict disapproves of the Scottish Church.

Giovanni Maria Vian, editor of L’Osservatore Romano, says Benedict XVI has a deep concern for priests.

Archbishop Claudio Maria Celli, president of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications, discusses evangelisation in the digital world (audio).

John Allen says the growing presence of foreign priests is helping to make American Catholicism less insular.

A Catholic who defended waterboarding on EWTN is facing severe criticism, the New York Times reports. R R Reno criticises the report.

The Wall Street Journal wonders if we are seeing the beginning of the end of the Reformation.

Tom Holland defends the much-maligned St Paul, as does Sarah Ruden.

Joseph Bottum and R R Reno clash over whether other countries should learn from France’s approach to religious freedom.

Fr Aidan Nichols OP has given a Lent lecture on the priesthood (video) and the Congregation for Clergy has uploaded a trio of videos to YouTube about the priest as Alter Christus.

And Vaticano Spa (“Vatican Ltd”), a book about the alleged murky financial dealings of the Vatican, is a bestseller in Italy.

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

Rocco Palmo reports on a growing clerical backlash against Archbishop Diarmuid Martin of Dublin.

Cardinal Franc Rodé, prefect of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life, sees a “crisis” among religious orders today.

The Vatican is preparing a new document on lay brothers.

Auxiliary Bishop Peter Elliott of Melbourne, a former Anglo-Catholic, assesses the Pope’s outreach to Anglicans (Christian Campbell responds).

Vatican Cardinal Paul Cordes offers a guide to the Pope’s Lenten message (full text of message here).

Pope Benedict has given his blessing to participants in this year’s
Winter Olympics.

The Pontifical Sistine Choir is looking for new singers.

No Hidden Magenta considers the impact of a “bioethics bombshell“.

CNN profiles a Mexican priest on the front line in the drug wars in Ciudad Juarez.

Catholics at Catholic colleges less likely to stray from the Church, a study has found.

Tom Hoopes says recent deaths have left a “Catholic greatness void”.

Blogger Paulinus unveils a cunning plan to thwart the National Secular Society.

Fr Dwight Longenecker has an epiphany while celebrating Mass.

Fr James Martin SJ reveals that he has a knack for guessing Oscar winners.

Michael Sean Winters is revolted by the National Prayer Breakfast.

And Cranmer imagines what an American pope might look like.

Secularists to follow Pope

leave a comment »

The National Secular Society is not amused by news of Pope Benedict’s visit to Britain. Apparently all three members are planning to turn up to protest at papal events.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to Ma.gnoliaAdd to TechnoratiAdd to FurlAdd to Newsvine

Written by Luke Coppen

September 25, 2009 at 8:24 am