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Posts Tagged ‘Fr Tim Finigan

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The weekend’s big story was the Vatican’s response to the unprecedented police raid on the Belgian Church. Pope Benedict XVI described the police’s methods as “deplorable” and Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone said they were “unbelievable”. A lawyer for the Mechelen-Brussels archdiocese said the Church was considering legal action. But Belgian anti-paedophilia campaigner Fr Rik Devillè insisted the raids were “a good thing”. Rod Dreher says the Pope was wrong to speak out. And Fr Tim Finigan considers the state of the Belgian Church.

Archbishop Angelo Amato beatified the Maronite monk Estephan Nehmeh in Lebanon yesterday.

Pope Benedict urged the faithful to “contemplate the divine-human heart of the Lord Jesus” at his Angelus address yesterday (full text).

Cardinal Walter Kasper has confirmed his imminent retirement as president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity.

Ann Widdecombe will be the next British ambassador to the Holy See, the Sunday Telegraph reports.

The Pope has turned down an offer to appear on BBC Radio 4’s Thought for the Day programme, the Telegraph suggests.

Archbishop Silvano Tomasi, the Holy See’s permanent observer to the UN in Geneva, has addressed the Human Rights Council on maternal mortality (full text).

Rocco Palmo says the Vatican’s year is ending on a diplomatic high note.

Valle Adurni wonders what will happen to church buildings if Anglicans accept the Pope’s offer.

John Coleman SJ hails an “almost perfect” film.

And James Preece predicts that the Pope will beatify Cardinal Newman in a red telephone box.

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The Traditional Anglican Communion has requested a Personal Ordinariate in the United Kingdom.

Irish children are safer today in the Catholic Church than before, Cardinal Seán Brady has said.

BP has donated $1 million to a Catholic charity helping fishermen affected by the oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico.

The National Museum of Catholic Art and History in New York has been forced to close.

Mgr Guido Marini has celebrated Mass ad orientem in the Roman Basilica of St Mary Major.

George Weigel says American Catholics have arrived a critical moment in their history.

Michael Sean Winters argues that Pope Benedict is “emphatically is not looking for a culture war”.

George Anderson SJ is dismayed by France’s ban on the burqa.

Fr James Martin SJ is outraged by James Carroll’s attack on priestly celibacy.

Theologian Tina Beattie argues that the bishops are “the most brutal and ignorant of moral dictators“.

Marcel LeJeune lists his 50 favourite saints’ quotations.

And Fr Tim Finigan reports on a go-kart competition for French priests.

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Pope Benedict XVI’s letter to the Irish Church has provoked a deluge of commentary. Here are some of the most interesting comments: John Allen, Lisa Miller, Fr Ray Blake, Fr Tim Finigan, George Pitcher, Giles Pinnock, the Daily Telegraph, the Observer, Vatican Radio, Fr Federico Lombardi and Archbishop Vincent Nichols.

The third official meeting of the representatives of the Holy See and of the SSPX for doctrinal talks took place on Saturday.

Catholics in Zambia are asking the Pope to remove the Archbishop Telesphore Mpundu of Lusaka.

Rome Reports says Archbishop Oscar Romero’s Cause is gaining new momentum (video).

Pope Benedict reflected on the universality of art at a concert on Saturday night in the Clementine Hall (video).

Theologian Tina Beattie and atheist Carl Packman discuss God, Christianity and violence.

And the Vatican now has an official Twitter account.

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The Catholic Education Service of England and Wales has issued a statement welcoming the passage of the sex education Bill last night. Fr Tim Finigan is dismayed by Church support for the Bill and Melanie Phillips suggests that the Schools Secretary Ed Balls has launched a “secular inquisition“.

Gordon Brown has said he will resist calls to legalise assisted suicide.

The Times wonders whether religion will determine the result of the British general election.

Germany’s Catholic bishops have promised that they will respond quickly to the abuse crisis in the country.

American Catholic leaders are calling for new efforts to achieve bipartisan healthcare reform.

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago has urged Catholics and Mormons to defend religious freedom together.

The Vatican previews the Pope’s trip to Malta in April (video).

David Gibson suggests the Vatican may have shown judicious restraint by shelving a report on condoms.

A spectacular new Caravaggio exhibition has opened in Rome (video).

A Communist barber in Rome says praying to John Paul II cured him of a hernia.

And Leon Suprenant offers a guide to the “top 10 confirmation saints you never considered“.

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Fr Tim Finigan asks whether Catholic state education in Britain has entered its “endgame”. Damian Thompson, John Smeaton, Mulier Fortis, St Mary Magdalen, and Sunday Morning Soapbox also reflect on the latest developments in the battle over sex education.

Forward in Faith UK is supporting a Day of Prayer today, the feast of the Chair of St Peter, in response to Anglicanorum Coetibus. Thinking Anglicans rounds up the latest developments. And Christian Campbell says that, despite claims to the contrary, groups of Anglicans around the world are preparing to respond to the Pope’s offer.

Two of the Vatican’s most senior officials have raised the issue of reducing the number of dioceses in Ireland.

Pope Benedict XVI began his traditional Lenten retreat on Sunday evening (audio). Shortly before, he gave the Angelus address in which he compared Lent to “a long retreat” (video).

Pope Benedict has confirmed that he will visit a Lutheran church in Rome next month.

The Pope has not yet received a letter from members of the Pontifical Academy for Life criticising their president, Archbishop Rino Fisichella.

The Guardian suggests that the Pope has condemned intrusive body scanners at airports.

No Hidden Magenta wonders if Europe is heading for its own Roe vs Wade.

Australian and Quebec will gain their first saints on October 17 (video).

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago will speak at Brigham Young University tomorrow on the topic “Catholics and Latter-day Saints: Partners in the Defence of Religious Freedom”.

A Marian statue damaged during the atomic bombing of Nagasaki will meet its counterpart in Guernica as part of a “peace pilgrimage” marking the 65th anniversary of the bombing.

America magazine examines the trends in the latest Annuario Pontificio and Rocco Palmo notes that the Catholic Church in America is still growing.

Robbers have shot dead a priest in Mexico.

The BBC reports that a monastery near Vienna is offering men the chance to “be a monk for a weekend“.

Bishop Thomas Tobin of Providence, Rhode Island, asks whether John Paul II was “crazy or holy“.

Zenit meets the Polish twin brothers who both felt called to the priesthood in the Salesian order.

And Da Mihi Animas marvels at the skills of the skateboarding friar (video).

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Pope Benedict XVI said true conversion prevents us becoming “slaves of evil or at least prisoners of moral mediocrity” at his general audience yesterday (video). He received ashes at St Sabina, in accordance with tradition (video).

Archbishop Timothy Dolan of New York has a simple message for Lent: “Get back to confession.”

Fr Tom Rosica, head of Salt + Light Television, Canada’s national Catholic television station, has uploaded a series of Lenten meditations to YouTube.

More than one million people have already reserved a place to see the Turin Shroud when it goes on display for the first time in a decade in April.

Pope Benedict XVI must not overlook the suffering of those abused in the care of Church-run institutions in Northern Ireland, an abuse victim there has said.

Paul Inwood, Director of Music and Liturgy of Portsmouth diocese, says the impact of the new English translation of the Mass “is not as upsetting as one might have thought” (scroll down to comments). Meanwhile, Jeffrey Tucker is disturbed by Mr Inwood’s suggestion that he attended a demonstration Mass with the new texts with music.

The BBC hopes that the Pope will appear on Radio 4’s Thought for the Day during his visit to Britain.

No more than 200 people attended the protest against Pope Benedict in London last Sunday, says Fr Tim Finigan.

A father in Chicago could be jailed after taking his three-year-old daughter to a Catholic church.

Andrew Sullivan is appalled by EWTN’s decision to broadcast an interview with a leading apologist for torture (warning: graphic images).

Rob Vischer asks what Catholic legal theory has to say to the Tea Party movement.

And No Hidden Magenta says the Church and controversial ethicist Peter Singer have a surprising thing in common.

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Pope Benedict XVI said the Beatitudes offer “a new horizon of justice” in his Angelus address yesterday, after visiting a Caritas shelter for the homeless in Rome (Angelus video here, full text of Caritas address here).

Archbishop Bernard Longley of Birmingham has issued his first pastoral letter.

A petition urging the British Government not to pay a penny for Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to Britain has gathered 20,000 signatures and will be handed in at Downing Street on March 4.

Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster has said that Britons no longer know how to deal with death.

The Equality Bill’s report stage will take place on March 2.

The report stage and third reading of a Bill making sex education compulsory for 16-year-olds will take place on February 23.

The BBC is to broadcast a three-part documentary featuring Francis Campbell, the British Ambassador to the Holy See.

The Franciscans have announced that they are giving up their British mother house.

John Allen previews Pope Benedict’s summit with the Irish bishops this week, while Colum Kenny argues that it is more about power than justice.

The Pope has picked a Czech bishop once jailed and forced into factory work under Communism to lead Prague archdiocese.

The Pope has urged members of the Pontifical Academy for Life to protect and safeguard human life (video, full text).

Benedict XVI has led a lectio divina meditation at the Pontifical Roman Major Seminary (video).

The Church must “open its arms to all migrants“, a Vatican congress has declared.

Pope Benedict is tipped to make as many as four new Asian cardinals at the next consistory, expected in October.

This Friday an ordinary public consistory will be held for the canonisation of six Blesseds.

Police in Philadelphia have arrested a priest for possession of cocaine.

Cardinal Seán O’Malley has written to female religious in Boston archdiocese urging them to cooperate with the Apostolic Visitation of US women religious.

George Weigel says the Obama administration is pushing an “anorexic” notion of religious freedom around the world.

John Allen says the most senior African prelate in the Roman Curia is determined to take risks.

Astrology and Feng Shui can draw people closer to God, a Filipino bishop has claimed.

Andrew Gray says Pope Benedict’s visit to Scotland will give a fillip to the fight against the “culture of death”.

Fr Tim Finigan spots an unusual calendrical coincidence related to the apparitions at Lourdes.

Fr John Flynn, LC, criticises the “growing trend” of humanising pets.

A small group of Christian Conservatives are rewriting Tory party doctrine, argues the FT.

L’Osservatore Romano has named the Oasis album What’s The Story Morning Glory? one of the 10 greatest albums of all time.

Jessica Alba has said she will not take off her clothes in a film because of her Catholic upbringing.

And new video purports to show Hitler’s furious reaction to the pontificate of Pope Benedict XVI.

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Pope Benedict has denounced clashes between African immigrants and the local population in southern Italy, as well as the murder of Copts in Egypt.

He has also visited the French Cardinal Roger Etchegaray, who was hospitalised after breaking a hip during the Pope’s Midnight Mass security scare, and praised the Pontifical North American College.

The Holy Year of St James has begun in style at Santiago de Compostela.

Malaysia’s Christians are defying recent attacks.

The man who nearly killed John Paul II is reportedly considering book and film offers.

This is what the Pope said during his recent visit to a Rome soup kitchen.

Cindy Wooden previews Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to Rome’s Great Synagogue next Sunday.

John Allen wonders how the Vatican will react to signs of secularisation in Latin America.

A leading charity says a new British Government Bill will make it illegal for the Catholic Church to deny ordination to women.

Fr Tim Finigan explains what it’s like to celebrate Mass in St Peter’s Basilica.

Mulier Fortis ponders what’s behind the “Stand Up for Vatican II” campaign.

Broadcaster Simon Mayo claims the BBC is “driving religion to the margin”.

Mgr Graham Leonard’s funeral will take place at the Oxford Oratory on January 21.

The Archdiocese of Milwaukee has defended a controversial sculpture of the disgraced former Archbishop Rembert Weakland.

Thinking Faith, the online journal of the British Jesuits, reviews two major new books about Christian-Muslim relations.

A new documentary about the Catholic novelist Walker Percy will air in America this year.

New Atheists are upset by the “God mode” in Windows 7.

And Mel Gibson urges politicians to read the work of Hilaire Belloc.

Praise for a pioneer of the Catholic blogosphere

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Jeffrey Tucker pays tribute to Shawn Tribe, founder of the New Liturgical Movement (NLM) website:

When the history of our liturgical epoch is written, I believe that NLM will play a huge role, and NLM is made possible only through the work of Shawn Tribe, who has dedicated himself so passionately and resolutely to causes that are depreciated in the culture at large: beauty and truth.

He has an incredibly difficult job but you would never know it from the way he manages the site. Grace and good will define his style, and the daily sacrifices he makes for the Catholic world are rarely noted. He doesn’t seek praise, for that matter. He seeks to do good things. And no, he does not know that I would be writing or posting this tribute.

Fr Tim Finigan says the praise is well deserved:

The standard of writing and the excellence of content at NLM has been consistent, reliable and always in accord not only with the liturgical teaching of the Catholic Church but also with her moral and spiritual teaching. The blog is a model of all that Pope Benedict has said concerning the online apostolate. It has a deserved place high up on every Catholic blogger’s blogroll. I heartily second Jeffrey’s tribute.

I’ve been working on a long Q and A interview with Shawn, which I hope will see the light of day in 2009 (actually, make that 2010).

Written by Luke Coppen

December 8, 2009 at 9:34 am