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Posts Tagged ‘Fr Dwight Longenecker

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Rocco Palmo publishes the liturgical texts for the feast of John Henry Newman, rumoured to be October 9.

Every Catholic should be a disciple of St Thomas Aquinas, Pope Benedict XVI said at his general audience yesterday (full text).

The Pope received some 20,000 text messages of support after the general audience.

Bishop Walter Mixa has reportedly agreed to stand by his decision to resign.

Archbishop Peter Smith of Southwark has said he hopes the Lautsi case will not force “all European countries to conform to a model of secularism that is antagonistic to any manifestation of religion in the public sphere”.

The registered number of Catholics in Japan has fallen by half a per cent in a year.

John Allen discusses Christian-Muslim relations with Cardinal Angelo Scola, Patriarch of Venice.

William Van Ornum asks if the Church is losing good potential priests because of psychological testing.

The Saint Barnabus’ Blog says it is now too late for Anglo-Catholicism to survive.

Fr Dwight Longenecker reflects on the “brilliantly annoying style” of GK Chesterton.

Patrick Madrid says Marcial Maciel is to the Legion of Christ what the Deepwater Horizon rig is to the Gulf of Mexico.

And Rome Reports showcases the worst-dressed priests in the world (video).

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Caritas is bringing aid to the two million Chileans affected by the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck on Saturday.

The Ugandan bishops began their week-long ad limina visit to Rome yesterday (audio).

Christians and Muslims in Lebanon will be sharing the Feast of the Annunciation as a national holiday.

Female students at American Catholic colleges are more sexually promiscuous than their counterparts at secular schools, according to a new study.

Rocco Palmo crunches the numbers after reports that the next consistory creating new cardinals will be held in November.

Fr Dwight Longenecker takes on Richard Harries, the former Anglican Bishop of Oxford.

Historian Diarmaid MacCulloch defends his interpretation of the Second Vatican Council.

George Neumayr explains why Benedict XVI’s recent speech to the Roman Rota about annulments was so important.

First Things is celebrating its 20th anniversary.

Jeffrey Tucker wonders why the traditional Reproaches on Good Friday have “all but vanished today“.

And Joe Egerton wonders what St Ignatius of Loyola would say about the allegations that Gordon Brown is a bully.

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Rocco Palmo reports on a growing clerical backlash against Archbishop Diarmuid Martin of Dublin.

Cardinal Franc Rodé, prefect of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life, sees a “crisis” among religious orders today.

The Vatican is preparing a new document on lay brothers.

Auxiliary Bishop Peter Elliott of Melbourne, a former Anglo-Catholic, assesses the Pope’s outreach to Anglicans (Christian Campbell responds).

Vatican Cardinal Paul Cordes offers a guide to the Pope’s Lenten message (full text of message here).

Pope Benedict has given his blessing to participants in this year’s
Winter Olympics.

The Pontifical Sistine Choir is looking for new singers.

No Hidden Magenta considers the impact of a “bioethics bombshell“.

CNN profiles a Mexican priest on the front line in the drug wars in Ciudad Juarez.

Catholics at Catholic colleges less likely to stray from the Church, a study has found.

Tom Hoopes says recent deaths have left a “Catholic greatness void”.

Blogger Paulinus unveils a cunning plan to thwart the National Secular Society.

Fr Dwight Longenecker has an epiphany while celebrating Mass.

Fr James Martin SJ reveals that he has a knack for guessing Oscar winners.

Michael Sean Winters is revolted by the National Prayer Breakfast.

And Cranmer imagines what an American pope might look like.

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Love is “the badge of the Christian“, Pope Benedict XVI said in his Angelus address yesterday (video here).

The Pope also called on businesses around the world to stem the flow of job losses.

SSPX members have attacked an FSSP church in Mexico.

Meanwhile, Bishop Richard Williamson is continuing to deny the Holocaust.

The reconstruction of Haiti needs to be based on human rights and the principle of subsidiarity, the Holy See’s representative at the UN has said.

The Catholic News Service now has a reporter on the ground in Haiti who will be filing reports all this week.

A Catholic woman is refusing to pay her licence fee over the BBC’s support for abortion.

Almost three quarters of British people support assisted suicide for the terminally ill, according to a BBC poll.

Quality not quantity is the key to Catholic education, Cardinal Seán Brady has told Vatican Radio (audio).

Fr Richard Duffield of the Birmingham Oratory has met Cardinal Seán O’Malley of Boston to discuss Newman’s Cause.

Susan Boyle says she is dreaming of singing for the Pope when he visits Scotland on the first leg of his visit to Britain in September.

The Knights of Columbus are delivering 100,000 prayer books to US armed services personnel.

No Hidden Magenta wonders if Peter Singer and the Catholic Church can end global poverty together.

Fr Dwight Longenecker “shoots at his hunting buddies” with a critique of traditionalism.

And Father Z considers whether to buy the National Catholic Reporter.

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Photo: Benedict XVI is seen during his visit to Rome’s synagogue yesterday (AP Photo/ Osservatore Romano, Ho)

This is what Pope Benedict XVI said during his visit to Rome’s Great Synagogue yesterday. John Allen provides analysis, while the New York Times asks whether Pius XII was a saint.

Archbishop John Hepworth, Primate of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC), has released details of his correspondence with Cardinal William Levada, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, concerning Anglicanorum coetibus, and says the TAC will respond formally to the Pope’s offer at Eastertide.

Meanwhile, America magazine has named the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, the winner of its Campion Award.

Cardinal Christoph Schönborn has issued a qualified apology to Bishop Ratko Perić of Mostar-Duvno following his controversial visit to Medjugorje.

The New York Times reports on yesterday’s Mass outside Port-au-Prince’s ruined cathedral. Meanwhile, Richard Dawkins doesn’t want believers to get the credit for helping Haitians following the devastating earthquake.

Cardinal Roger Etchegaray has finally left hospital after breaking his hip in the Midnight Mass incident in St Peter’s Basilica.

Peter Steinfels pays tribute to the late theologian Edward Schillebeeckx.

Charlotte Allen argues that, following the deaths of Schillebeeckx and Mary Daly, the flame of Catholic dissent is dying out.

The University of Notre Dame is once again at the centre of controversy after its student-run newspaper published an anti-gay cartoon.

Michael Sean-Winters challenges Archbishop Raymond Burke’s assessment of America (the archbishop’s full homily is here).

Pastor in Valle says Pope Benedict has transformed Rome.

You can find out what the Pope is doing for the next three months here.

And Fr Dwight Longenecker explains why Catholic churches should be tall.