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Posts Tagged ‘Archbishop of Canterbury

Morning Catholic must-reads

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The Pope is expected to name Archbishop Velasio DePaolis the Apostolic Delegate to the Legion of Christ.

The Archbishop of Canterbury and the Archbishop of York are reportedly preparing to make a last-ditch effort to prevent thousands of traditionalists leaving the Church of England.

The Vatican’s spokesman expressed “esteem and solidarity” with Cardinal Crescenzio Sepe yesterday as it emerged that police are investigating the Archbishop of Naples for alleged corruption.

Benedict XVI made an urgent appeal for peace in southern Kyrgyzstan and prayed for the world’s refugees after the Angelus on Sunday (full text, video).

Pope Benedict ordained 14 new priests for the Diocese of Rome in St Peter’s Basilica yesterday (hfull text).

A Vatican spokesman has denied reports that the disgraced former Archbishop of Poznań, Juliusz Paetz, is to be “rehabilitated”.

Zenit publishes the final part of Pope Benedict’s question-and-answer session with priests.

Fr Edward Daly welcomes the Saville report into Bloody Sunday.

Commonweal responds to criticism by the US bishops of its stance on the healthcare bill.

John Allen points out the “elephants in the room” of the Catholic debate on healthcare reform.

Kevin O’Rourke looks at “the complicated reasons behind an abortion at a Catholic hospital” in Phoenix.

George Weigel describes the alternative to “Catholic Lite”.

Karl Giberson urges Christians not to vilify the New Atheists.

Joanna Bogle profiles Catholic Voices, which aims to transform the media image of Catholicism during the Pope’s visit to Britain.

Austen Ivereigh applauds Archbishop Vincent Nichols’s efforts to promote the papal visit.

Rocco Palmo reports on the remarkable success of the iBreviary app for the iPhone.

And Fr Z wonders if the iPad will replace the altar missal.

Today’s Catholic must-reads

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A Vatican economist has claimed that the true cause of the recession is the West’s falling birth rate.

Anglo-Catholic Bishop Edwin Barnes accuses the Archbishop of Canterbury of making it impossible for Anglican traditionalists to remain in the Church of England.

The informal ecumenical symposium at the Vatican will end today, reports Vatican Radio.

The Archdiocese of Boston has raised $15 million in an appeal, matching last year’s total.

A Catholic priest has lost six relatives in a terrorist attack in Pakistan.

The bishops of Sri Lanka are appealing for a code of conduct for the country’s politicians.

Catholics are being urged to get to grips with the new English translation of the Mass even before it is introduced.

Australia’s bishops have launched an online companion to Lent.

John Allen explains why everyone is so enthusiastic about Archbishop Gianfranco Ravasi, the papabile president of the Pontifical Council for Culture.

The Anchoress is thrilled by yesterday’s Oprah Winfrey show segment on the Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist.

Deborah Morlani ponders the role of mothers in liturgical reform.

Mark Davoren OP celebrates the remarkable life of Fr Cormac Rigby, former BBC Radio 3 presenter.

Fr James Martin SJ addresses “papalotry” among American Catholic intellectuals.

And Fr Z recommends that liberal Catholics ask Dr Rowan Williams for a “Spirit of Vatican II Ordinariate“.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Pope Benedict XVI has given his support to priest-bloggers in his World Communications Day message (full text here).

The Pope has decided to create a new commission to investigate alleged apparitions at Medjugorje, Cardinal Christoph Schönborn has said.

We must ask God for the gift of the complete unity of all the disciples of Christ, the Pope said yesterday during his Angelus address (video here).

As the Archbishop of Port-au-Prince was laid to rest, the Pope sent a letter of condolence to the president of Haiti, Vatican Radio reports (audio).

The Archbishop of Canterbury has attended a Mass at Westminster Cathedral celebrated by Archbishop Vincent Nichols (photos here).

Faith schools “must be absolutely clear about the importance of civil partnerships“, Education Secretary Ed Balls has said.

The Murphy Report has become an unlikely bestseller in Ireland.

The new Chaldean Archbishop of Mosul has been installed, succeeding the slain Archbishop Paulos Faraj Rahho.

An eight-month-old boy is being cared for after being taken from his home in Nottinghamshire and abandoned on the steps of an Irish cathedral.

A pro-life advertisement will air during this year’s Superbowl.

The Guardian publishes an approving profile of “America’s last late-term abortionist“.

No Hidden Magenta wonders why pro-lifers have embraced the pro-choice Scott Brown.

Simon Sarmiento accuses the churches of panicking over the Equality Bill.

Fr Ray Blake says Benedict XVI’s policy on distributing Holy Communion at papal liturgies is “absurd and nonsensical“.

Adam Kirsch says Hans Küng offers Judaism backhanded praise in his latest book.

James Wood reflects on how preachers deal with natural disasters like the earthquake in Haiti.

Francis X Clooney SJ says we shouldn’t completely dismiss Pat Robertson’s comments about Haiti and Peter Schineller SJ considers whether the Church supports “the right to loot“.

And Pope Benedict has announced plans to build a second Vatican on the moon by the year 2017 (audio).

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Rocco Palmo applauds the appointment of a woman, Dr Flaminia Giovanelli, to a high-ranking post in the Roman Curia.

Pope Benedict XVI gave the traditional blessing of lambs on the feast of St Agnes yesterday (video here).

Cardinal Bertone will remain in his post as Vatican Secretary of State even though he has reached the age of retirement.

Giles Pinnock reports on the funeral Mass of Mgr Graham Leonard, the former Anglican Bishop of London.

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, speaks to Vatican Radio about the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity (audio).

The Bishop of Winchester, the Rt Rev Michael Scott-Joynt, has described the Equality Bill as “irrational and ignorant”.

As many as 30 seminarians were killed in the Haiti earthquake, Zenit reports.

Fr David Jaeger gives an insight into the delicate state of relations between Israel and the Holy See.

William Saletan uncovers the practice of sex-selection abortion in the United States.

The Mirror of Justice has begun its discussion of John Allen’s important new book The Future Church.

And American bishop who is due for retirement has earned the ultimate accolade: he has become a bobblehead.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Photo: Benedict XVI is seen during his visit to Rome’s synagogue yesterday (AP Photo/ Osservatore Romano, Ho)

This is what Pope Benedict XVI said during his visit to Rome’s Great Synagogue yesterday. John Allen provides analysis, while the New York Times asks whether Pius XII was a saint.

Archbishop John Hepworth, Primate of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC), has released details of his correspondence with Cardinal William Levada, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, concerning Anglicanorum coetibus, and says the TAC will respond formally to the Pope’s offer at Eastertide.

Meanwhile, America magazine has named the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, the winner of its Campion Award.

Cardinal Christoph Schönborn has issued a qualified apology to Bishop Ratko Perić of Mostar-Duvno following his controversial visit to Medjugorje.

The New York Times reports on yesterday’s Mass outside Port-au-Prince’s ruined cathedral. Meanwhile, Richard Dawkins doesn’t want believers to get the credit for helping Haitians following the devastating earthquake.

Cardinal Roger Etchegaray has finally left hospital after breaking his hip in the Midnight Mass incident in St Peter’s Basilica.

Peter Steinfels pays tribute to the late theologian Edward Schillebeeckx.

Charlotte Allen argues that, following the deaths of Schillebeeckx and Mary Daly, the flame of Catholic dissent is dying out.

The University of Notre Dame is once again at the centre of controversy after its student-run newspaper published an anti-gay cartoon.

Michael Sean-Winters challenges Archbishop Raymond Burke’s assessment of America (the archbishop’s full homily is here).

Pastor in Valle says Pope Benedict has transformed Rome.

You can find out what the Pope is doing for the next three months here.

And Fr Dwight Longenecker explains why Catholic churches should be tall.

The Pope’s offer to Anglicans: eccentric or inspired?

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Fr John Hunwicke SSC, a thoughtful commentator on Anglo-Catholic affairs, wonders whether the theology of Anglicanorum coetibus is in fact eccentric:

Archbishop Rowan didn’t – despite the claims of his critics – call the ecclesiology of Anglicanorum Coetibus eccentric. He suggested that there are others who might say it…

His Grace has a point. The ecclesiology of AC does diverge from the norms to which we are accustomed and which he himself has lucidly expounded: that a “local church” is not a denomination or a province but bishop-and-presbytery-and-diaconate-and laos. Perhaps his words indicate that he is going to make one last herculean effort to secure just such an uneccentric provision for us from General Synod. If he is, all power to his elbow…

Where Rowan fails is in not taking account of some aspects of the exercise of Primacy. This was well set out in The Gift of Authority (ARCIC 1999). “We envisage a primacy that will even now help to uphold the legitimate diversity of traditions, strengthening and safeguarding them in fidelity to the Gospel … This sort of primacy will already assist the Church on earth to be the authentic catholic Koinonia in which unity does not curtail diversity … Such a universal primate … will promote the common good in ways that are not constrained by sectional interests …”

It is the ministry of the Roman Church to uphold diversity. Roman Pontiffs have not always done that as robustly as they should; in North America they once were less forthright than they ought to have been in defending the patrimony of Eastern Catholic communities – or even the Poles – against local Irish and German diocesan bishops.

But this pope, as far as one can see, has got a well screwed on head.

Written by Luke Coppen

December 14, 2009 at 7:01 pm

Rowan Williams: Pope’s offer to Anglicans is ‘no solution’

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The Archbishop of Canterbury gives a provocative interview to George Pitcher of the Daily Telegraph.

Dr Williams declines to be drawn on whether, when he saw him in Rome recently, the Pope was regretful or sorry for effectively jumping him – “private conversation, I think” – but he does concede that the hastily convened press conference, at which he sat uncomfortably alongside the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Westminster, Vincent Nichols, was a big mistake.

“I think everyone on the platform was a bit uncomfortable … I know the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith on the whole doesn’t go in for much consultation – we were just on the receiving end of that.”

Really? Isn’t there something rather acquisitive and invasive about this Pope, who wants us to know that there is one universal voice of authority and it speaks from Rome? Dr Williams suddenly opens up: “Nothing entirely new about that of course. At the end of John Paul II’s pontificate you have that discussion of how papal authority is meant to be understood, how it might be received by others. I think that’s treading water at the moment. I’d like to see that revived and that’s part of what I was nudging at in Rome.

“Second thing is that in British Catholicism there’s a kind of resurgent – no – recurrent cycle of the ‘second spring’, in Cardinal Newman’s imagery, and in the wave of distinguished converts in the interwar years, Evelyn Waugh and so on. There was just a hint of it when Cardinal Hume uncharacteristically talked about the reconversion of England – and I think he regretted that actually. And a few people in the last round. It’s a pattern, the sense that the Reformation wounds are going to be healed in favour of Rome. And it just keeps coming back – I think this has been the occasion for another little bit of that. It’s bits of the repertoire.”

The languid manner in which he delivers this leaves no doubt that he’s not holding his breath for a Roman second spring either. I wonder whether the Pope has, unwittingly and ironically, provided the kind of “third province” that Anglo-Catholics were demanding because they can’t accept women bishops, lesbian or otherwise. The Revision Committee for women bishops, after all, dropped proposals for legal protection for them in the wake of the Pope’s initiative.

“I would guess that the papal announcement had some impact on the way some people thought and voted on the committee,” concedes Dr Williams. “But actually I don’t think it is a solution. A great many Anglo-Catholics have good reason for not being Roman Catholics. They don’t believe the Pope is infallible. And that’s why they’re still pressing for a solution in Anglican terms, rather than what many of them see as a theologically rather eccentric option on the Roman side.”

Written by Luke Coppen

December 12, 2009 at 3:35 pm

Pope and Archbishop of Canterbury in ‘cordial’ meeting

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The Archbishop of Canterbury had an approximately 20-minute meeting with the Pope today. The Vatican issued this statement afterwards:

This morning His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI received in private audience His Grace Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury.

In the course of the cordial discussions attention turned to the challenges facing all Christian communities at the beginning of this millennium, and to the need to promote forms of collaboration and shared witness in facing these challenges.

The discussions also focused on recent events affecting relations between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion, reiterating the shared will to continue and to consolidate the ecumenical relationship between Catholics and Anglicans, and recalling how, over coming days, the commission entrusted with preparing the third phase of international theological dialogue between the parties (ARCIC) is due to meet.

After the meeting, Dr Williams spoke to Vatican Radio.

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Written by Luke Coppen

November 21, 2009 at 2:49 pm

Breaking news: Traditional Anglicans to be reunited with Rome

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So, as expected, this morning the Vatican has unveiled the mechanism by which traditionalist Anglicans can be received as a group into the Catholic Church.

The provision is much more far-reaching than previously expected. Rather than creating a personal prelature for the Traditional Anglican Communion, along the lines of Opus Dei, the Pope has decided to establish “personal ordinariates”, along the lines of military ordinariates, which could potentially serve all former Anglicans, both clergy and lay.

Disaffected Anglicans must now approach the Holy See, expressing their desire to take up the provision. The Holy See will then contact the local bishops’ conference to discuss whether it is possible to create the personal ordinariate.

Referring to an Apostolic Constitution to be released shortly in Rome, Cardinal Levada, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, outlined the process that will allow former Anglicans to enter full communion corporately while retaining elements of the Anglican tradition.

The CDF said:

In this Apostolic Constitution the Holy Father has introduced a canonical structure that provides for such corporate reunion by establishing Personal Ordinariates, which will allow former Anglicans to enter full communion with the Catholic Church while preserving elements of the distinctive Anglican spiritual and liturgical patrimony. Under the terms of the Apostolic Constitution, pastoral oversight and guidance will be provided for groups of former Anglicans through a Personal Ordinariate, whose Ordinary will usually be appointed from among former Anglican clergy.

The forthcoming Apostolic Constitution provides a reasonable and even necessary response to a world-wide phenomenon, by offering a single canonical model for the universal Church which is adaptable to various local situations and equitable to former Anglicans in its universal application. It provides for the ordination as Catholic priests of married former Anglican clergy. Historical and ecumenical reasons preclude the ordination of married men as bishops in both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. The Constitution therefore stipulates that the Ordinary can be either a priest or an unmarried bishop. The seminarians in the Ordinariate are to be prepared alongside other Catholic seminarians, though the Ordinariate may establish a house of formation to address the particular needs of formation in the Anglican patrimony. In this way, the Apostolic Constitution seeks to balance on the one hand the concern to preserve the worthy Anglican liturgical and spiritual patrimony and, on the other hand, the concern that these groups and their clergy will be integrated into the Catholic Church…

The provision of this new structure is consistent with the commitment to ecumenical dialogue, which continues to be a priority for the Catholic Church, particularly through the efforts of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity.

In London, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, and Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster issued a joint statement on the move.

It said:

Today’s announcement of the Apostolic Constitution is a response by Pope Benedict XVI to a number of requests over the past few years to the Holy See from groups of Anglicans who wish to enter into full visible communion with the Roman Catholic Church, and are willing to declare that they share a common Catholic faith and accept the Petrine ministry as willed by Christ for his Church.

Pope Benedict XVI has approved, within the Apostolic Constitution, a canonical structure that provides for Personal Ordinariates, which will allow former Anglicans to enter full communion with the Catholic Church while preserving elements of distinctive Anglican spiritual patrimony.

The announcement of this Apostolic Constitution brings to an end a period of uncertainty for such groups who have nurtured hopes of new ways of embracing unity with the Catholic Church. It will now be up to those who have made requests to the Holy See to respond to the Apostolic Constitution.

The Apostolic Constitution is further recognition of the substantial overlap in faith, doctrine and spirituality between the Catholic Church and the Anglican tradition. Without the dialogues of the past forty years, this recognition would not have been possible, nor would hopes for full visible unity have been nurtured. In this sense, this Apostolic Constitution is one consequence of ecumenical dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion.

The on-going official dialogue between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion provides the basis for our continuing cooperation. The Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) and International Anglican Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission (IARCCUM) agreements make clear the path we will follow together.

With God’s grace and prayer we are determined that our on-going mutual commitment and consultation on these and other matters should continue to be strengthened. Locally, in the spirit of IARCCUM, we look forward to building on the pattern of shared meetings between the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales and the Church of England’s House of Bishops with a focus on our common mission. Joint days of reflection and prayer were begun in Leeds in 2006 and continued in Lambeth in 2008, and further meetings are in preparation. This close cooperation will continue as we grow together in unity and mission, in witness to the Gospel in our country, and in the Church at large.

Ruth Gledhill has a copy of a letter Dr Williams has sent to his fellow C of E bishops. He says:

I am sorry that there has been no opportunity to alert you earlier to this; I was informed of the planned announcement at a very late stage, and we await the text of the Apostolic Constitution itself and its code of practice in the coming weeks…

It remains to be seen what use will be made of this provision, since it is now up to those who have made requests to the Holy See to respond to the Apostolic Constitution; but, in the light of recent discussions with senior officials in the Vatican, I can say that this new possibility is in no sense at all intended to undermine existing relations between our two communions or to be an act of proselytism or aggression. It is described as simply a response to specific enquiries from certain Anglican groups and individuals wishing to find their future within the Roman Catholic Church.

Vatican-watcher John Allen says the announcement will have far-reaching implications:

In a move with potentially sweeping implications for relations between the Catholic church and some 80 million Anglicans worldwide, the Vatican has announced the creation of new ecclesiastical structures to absorb disaffected Anglicans wishing to become Catholics. The structures will allow those Anglicans to hold onto their distinctive spiritual practices, including the ordination of married former Anglican clergy as Catholic priests…

According to a Vatican “note” released this morning, married men may serve as priests in the new ordinariates, but they may not be ordained as bishops. The details will be presented in a new apostolic constitution from Pope Benedict XVI, expected to be issued shortly.
The Vatican note described the new “personal ordinariates” as similar to the structures created throughout the world to provide pastoral care for members of the military and their families. The structures are, in effect, non-territorial dioceses, provided over by a bishop and with their own priests and seminarians.

A personal ordinariate is also similar to the canonical status of “personal prelature,” currently held by only one Catholic group: Opus Dei.

The note said the ordinariates will be created in consultation with the national bishops’ conference of a given country.

Bishop John Broadhurst and Fr Geoffrey Kirk of Forward in Faith UK, an Anglican grouping opposed to women priests and bishops, say:

It has been the frequently expressed hope and fervent desire of Anglican Catholics to be enabled by some means to enter into full communion with the See of Peter whilst retaining in its integrity every aspect of their Anglican inheritance which is not at variance with the teaching of the Catholic Church.

We rejoice that the Holy Father intends now to set up structures within the Church which respond to this heartfelt longing. Forward in Faith has always been committed to seeking unity in truth and so warmly welcomes these initiatives as a decisive moment in the history of the Catholic Movement in the Church of England. Ut unum sint!

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, says:

Today the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops has received word of the new Provision in the form of an apostolic constitution issued by the Holy See for the reception into full communion with the Catholic Church of groups from the Anglican tradition. The USCCB stands ready to collaborate in the implementation of that Provision in our country.

This step by the Holy See is in response to a number of requests received in Rome from groups of Anglicans seeking corporate reunion. The application of the new Provision recognises the desire of some Anglicans (Episcopalians) to live the Catholic faith in full, visible communion with the See of Peter, while at the same time retaining some elements of their traditions of liturgy, spirituality and ecclesial life which are consistent with the Catholic faith.

This Provision, at the service of the unity of the Church, calls us as well to join our voices to the Priestly Prayer of Jesus that ‘all may be one’ (Jn 17:21) as we seek a greater communion with all our brothers and sisters with whom we share Baptism. For 45 years, our Episcopal Conference has engaged in ecumenical dialogue with The Episcopal Church, which is the historic Province of the Anglican communion in North America. The Catholic Bishops of the United States remain committed to seeking deeper unity with the members of The Episcopal Church by means of theological dialogue and collaboration in activities that advance the mission of Christ and the welfare of society.

Photo: The Archbishop of Canterbury and the Archbishop of Westminster at this morning’s press conference (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

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Written by Luke Coppen

October 20, 2009 at 10:35 am

Breaking news: traditional Anglicans reunited with Rome

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As expected, the Vatican has unveiled today the means by which the world’s traditionalist Anglicans can be received as a group into the Catholic Church.

In an Apostolic Constitution presented at the Vatican today, Cardinal Levada, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, outlined a canonical structure that would allow Anglicans to be in full communion with Rome while preserving their distinctive Anglican spiritual patrimony.

A statement from the CDF said:

In this Apostolic Constitution the Holy Father has introduced a canonical structure that provides for such corporate reunion by establishing Personal Ordinariates which will allow former Anglicans to enter full communion with the Catholic Church while preserving elements of the distinctive Anglican spiritual and liturgical patrimony.

As the news was announced in Rome, Dr Rowan Williams, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster held a joint press conference in London to discuss the Apostolic Constitution.

More details to follow.