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Posts Tagged ‘Archbishop Bernard Longley

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Archbishop Celestino Migliore has urged the international community to do more to tackle transnational organized crime (full text).

The oldest known image of the Apostles Andrew and John has been discovered in the Catacombs of Rome.

An Angolan Catholic priest has gone on trial accused of “crimes against state security” in connection with an attack on Togo’s national football team.

The Archbishops of Birmingham and Southwark will be among the 38 metropolitan archbishops receiving the pallium on June 29.

Pope Benedict XVI will greet an estimated 3,000 schoolchildren at an event during his visit to Britain.

The collapse of a masonry firm may hamper restoration work at St Andrews’ Cathedral in Glasgow.

An 83-year-old nun was killed in a collision with a minivan in Harlem yesterday.

Jack Smith urges Helen Osman, the USCCB secretary of communications, to clarify her criticisms of the Catholic News Agency.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Pope Benedict XVI has named José Gomez as the next Archbishop of Los Angeles.

We must seek to be messengers of God’s love, Pope Benedict said on Easter Monday (video).

Archbishop Bernard Longley of Birmingham has urged Catholics to pray for the Pope following “intense and unjustified” criticism. Meanwhile, a new website has been launched for Catholics to show their support for Pope Benedict.

Victims of clerical abuse who met Benedict XVI in 2008 have appealed for an October summit on the issue in Rome.

Fr Thomas Brundage has acknowledged that he was aware of an order to halt the trial of Fr Lawrence Murphy, but says that Murphy’s death two days later “made the matter moot”.

A priest accused of abuse in America is working in India and refusing to return to face charges. The Vatican’s lawyer has issued a statement on the case.

Michael Sean Winters says the Vatican needs to call in Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston to tackle the abuse crisis.

In a sneak preview of his new book, John Cornwell argues that Cardinal Newman was a critic of the Vatican.

It is not inevitable that euthanasia proponents will win the day, says Arland Nichols.

Rome Reports visits the Pontifical Beda College in Rome (video).

And Madeleine Bunting says the New Atheists have not dented the growth of religion across the world.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster described Oscar Romero as “a preacher of astonishing clarity and power” during a Mass marking the 30th anniversary of his murder yesterday.

More resignations are expected to follow that of Bishop John Magee of Cloyne.

Pope Benedict dedicated yesterday’s general audience to St Albert the Great (video).

President Barack Obama signed a controversial executive order on abortion yesterday.

Ross Douthat expresses sympathy for the much-criticised pro-life Democrat Bart Stupak.

Archbishop Bernard Longley has formally welcomed the Pope’s visit to the Archdiocese of Birmingham in September.

Forbes reports on billionaire Catholic Albert Gubay’s “pact with God“.

And Rocco Palmo of Whispers in the Loggia will be contributing regularly to Brooklyn diocese’s cable station.

Morning Catholic must-reads

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Pope Benedict XVI said the Beatitudes offer “a new horizon of justice” in his Angelus address yesterday, after visiting a Caritas shelter for the homeless in Rome (Angelus video here, full text of Caritas address here).

Archbishop Bernard Longley of Birmingham has issued his first pastoral letter.

A petition urging the British Government not to pay a penny for Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to Britain has gathered 20,000 signatures and will be handed in at Downing Street on March 4.

Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster has said that Britons no longer know how to deal with death.

The Equality Bill’s report stage will take place on March 2.

The report stage and third reading of a Bill making sex education compulsory for 16-year-olds will take place on February 23.

The BBC is to broadcast a three-part documentary featuring Francis Campbell, the British Ambassador to the Holy See.

The Franciscans have announced that they are giving up their British mother house.

John Allen previews Pope Benedict’s summit with the Irish bishops this week, while Colum Kenny argues that it is more about power than justice.

The Pope has picked a Czech bishop once jailed and forced into factory work under Communism to lead Prague archdiocese.

The Pope has urged members of the Pontifical Academy for Life to protect and safeguard human life (video, full text).

Benedict XVI has led a lectio divina meditation at the Pontifical Roman Major Seminary (video).

The Church must “open its arms to all migrants“, a Vatican congress has declared.

Pope Benedict is tipped to make as many as four new Asian cardinals at the next consistory, expected in October.

This Friday an ordinary public consistory will be held for the canonisation of six Blesseds.

Police in Philadelphia have arrested a priest for possession of cocaine.

Cardinal Seán O’Malley has written to female religious in Boston archdiocese urging them to cooperate with the Apostolic Visitation of US women religious.

George Weigel says the Obama administration is pushing an “anorexic” notion of religious freedom around the world.

John Allen says the most senior African prelate in the Roman Curia is determined to take risks.

Astrology and Feng Shui can draw people closer to God, a Filipino bishop has claimed.

Andrew Gray says Pope Benedict’s visit to Scotland will give a fillip to the fight against the “culture of death”.

Fr Tim Finigan spots an unusual calendrical coincidence related to the apparitions at Lourdes.

Fr John Flynn, LC, criticises the “growing trend” of humanising pets.

A small group of Christian Conservatives are rewriting Tory party doctrine, argues the FT.

L’Osservatore Romano has named the Oasis album What’s The Story Morning Glory? one of the 10 greatest albums of all time.

Jessica Alba has said she will not take off her clothes in a film because of her Catholic upbringing.

And new video purports to show Hitler’s furious reaction to the pontificate of Pope Benedict XVI.

What’s in The Catholic Herald this week

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In this week’s paper we report on the clash between Harriet Harman and the bishops of England and Wales over the Equality Bill, the installation of the popular new Archbishop of Birmingham and Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor’s decision to reject a seat in the House of Lords.

We also interview the son of St Gianna Beretta Molla, publish a robust defence of Anglo-Catholic “patrimony” and present a forceful appeal for a sharper divide between the roles of clergy and lay people.

This is just a hint of what’s in the paper. To get the whole story, you may like to pick up a copy (at the back of churches in Britain and Ireland) or subscribe.

Archbishop Longley takes charge of Birmingham archdiocese

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Photo: Archbishop Longley at the installation Mass (Mazur/catholicchurch.org.uk)

Archbishop Bernard Longley was installed in Birmingham yesterday, on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception. His homily can be downloaded as a PDF here.

He said:

Our Patronal Feast of the Immaculate Conception makes us aware of the power of Christ at work within us, as individuals and as communities, even – and perhaps with most effect, most fruitfully – when we are least aware of it. As Catholics we believe that our Lady was herself held free from sin and from the influence of original sin, from the first moment of her life, through the saving merits of her own Son, Jesus Christ. Her closeness to God is the first fruit of redemption and it eventually enabled her to recognise and welcome the hand of God directing the course of her life. Yet the most important moment of grace in Mary’s life occurred when she was as yet incapable of sensing or recognising it, still less understanding its importance.

It is often the same with us. Most of us were baptised as babies: the pattern of and potential for our lives of faith was established when we could never have understood or appreciated it. Only later in life we become grateful for what our parents and god-parents did for us and actively live the life of faith we received through their commitment to Christ and to us. Moments of grace often catch us unawares and it is only when we stop and reflect that we can appreciate their significance in the pattern of our lives.

Mary was prayerful and reflected on life’s experiences: she pondered these things in her heart. No doubt, as the life of her Son unfolded before her, she looked back and understood the meaning of what she had seen and heard and felt. St Luke does not disguise the fact that our Lady, even though she was full of grace, was deeply disturbed by the angel’s words. The natural, human reaction of bewilderment and astonishment at something so powerful caused her to face it and accept it. Mary had two moments of amazement: first that she was chosen: Rejoice, so highly favoured one. And then, that her life was to be fruitful with the birth of Christ, that she was chosen to be a mother.

Mary’s experience awakens in us the recognition of an extraordinary grace: we too, each of us, have been chosen and are highly favoured. In the words of St Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians: In him we were claimed as God’s own, chosen from the beginning. We shall never fully understand the reason for God’s choosing until we come one day to see him face to face, yet we have been chosen, each in our own particular way and together as the Church, to bear Christ to others.

The Feast of the Immaculate Conception reminds us, through Mary’s example, of the Church’s calling to be holy and to bear Christ to the world, and of the wonderment that overcomes us when we ponder on God’s choosing and calling and empowering.

Maureen Messent has a lively report on the occasion in the Birmingham Mail:

Let Rome’s detractors say what they will of us – our Catholic Church knows, as no other, when to parade the pomp, rejoice and remind ourselves our faith gives us a right to be merry.

We saw Bernard kneeling, in stark white, on the threshold of St Chad’s, to pray that he will be a faithful and prayerful servant of us, his flock, and, before that, came a long procession of priests from all over the archdiocese, identical in Birmingham’s ‘uniform’ of yellow and gold chasubles – and one poor priest got his skirt tangled around a cable so he looked, for a second, as if he were growing a little black tail.

Prelates in white lace with scarlet skirts followed. And after them came others with purple and scarlet vestments, bishops with crimson skullcaps – and a female worthy who wore an ostrich feather hat even more eye-catching than the male get-ups.

Archbishop Vincent Nichols was there in his old haunt, probably recalling his own enthronement in Birmingham and a tall and whippet-lean figure in crimson stood out as Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor – he still walks almost coltishly, albeit a little creakily these days…

[Archbishop Longley’s] homily was simple, almost humble, reminding us that this day was the feast of the Immaculate Conception when Our Lady’s life changed forever after the angel’s visitation.

“These thoughts have given me a profound sense of hope… for the Archdiocese of Birmingham,” he told us.

The clergy filed out. We had a new Archbishop who seemed likely to become a friend.

Here’s the Birmingham Post’s report, the BBC’s write-up, and the Independent Catholic News report.

Written by Luke Coppen

December 9, 2009 at 1:58 pm