Editor's Briefing

Luke Coppen's Catholic Herald Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Anglicanorum Coetibus

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

Archbishop Vincent Nichols of Westminster has urged Catholics to get behind the papal visit to Britain.

Cardinal Francis George, President of US Conference of Catholic Bishops, has said Sister Carol Keehan and her colleagues “are to blame” for the passage of the healthcare bill in March. John Allen offers analysis.

Pope Benedict insisted again that faith “protects reason from every temptation to mistrust its own capacities” at his general audience yesterday (full text).

The Apostolic Nuncio to Kyrgyzstan has described the fighting in the country as an “absolute catastrophe”.

Apostolic visitors have toured 35 US female religious communities so far and have 80 to go.

Scientists claim to have solved the mystery of Caravaggio’s death.

Cuban blogger Yoani Sanchez assesses the rise of the Catholic Church in the country.

A Reuters blogger feels uneasy about the Pope’s visit to Britain.

Fr Christopher Phillips considers whether papal infallibility will prove an obstacle to the success of Anglicanorum coetibus.

Matthew Warner asks if we need a new apologetics after Vatican II.

And Ross Douthat wonders if the Catholic Church is finished.

Advertisements

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

The Society for the Protection of Unborn Children (SPUC) is urging Catholics to ask their MPs to support an amendment to the Government’s sex education Bill, which is debated today.

The head of one of Scotland’s leading Catholic schools has said it is painful that a joined-up “Catholic world” of school, parish and home no longer exists.

The Bishop of Funchal has called for prayers following the devastating floods in Madeira.

The Toronto Apostolate of the Priestly Fraternity of St Peter (FSSP) will come to an abrupt end next Sunday.

The Traditional Anglican Communion in Central America has endorsed the Apostolic Constitution Anglicanorum Coetibus.

A bishop has called on Islamist terrorists in the Philippines to spare civilians.

Benedict XVI has written to the Brazilian bishops encouraging them to free people from slavery to money.

The Pope and the Roman Curia began their Lenten retreat with Eucharistic exposition and the celebration of Vespers (official video, Rome Reports video).

An exhibition focusing on John Paul II’s suffering has opened at the Vatican (video).

A Jesuit priest is to celebrate Mass in the Extraordinary Form at Fordham University Church.

Ana Roco Castro suggests 18 ways in which Catholics can use social media for evangelisation.

Richard Schickel of Vanity Fair explores the Catholic subtext of Martin Scorsese’s Raging Bull.

And the Curt Jester suggests an alternative cover design for L’Osservatore Romano.

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

Fr Tim Finigan asks whether Catholic state education in Britain has entered its “endgame”. Damian Thompson, John Smeaton, Mulier Fortis, St Mary Magdalen, and Sunday Morning Soapbox also reflect on the latest developments in the battle over sex education.

Forward in Faith UK is supporting a Day of Prayer today, the feast of the Chair of St Peter, in response to Anglicanorum Coetibus. Thinking Anglicans rounds up the latest developments. And Christian Campbell says that, despite claims to the contrary, groups of Anglicans around the world are preparing to respond to the Pope’s offer.

Two of the Vatican’s most senior officials have raised the issue of reducing the number of dioceses in Ireland.

Pope Benedict XVI began his traditional Lenten retreat on Sunday evening (audio). Shortly before, he gave the Angelus address in which he compared Lent to “a long retreat” (video).

Pope Benedict has confirmed that he will visit a Lutheran church in Rome next month.

The Pope has not yet received a letter from members of the Pontifical Academy for Life criticising their president, Archbishop Rino Fisichella.

The Guardian suggests that the Pope has condemned intrusive body scanners at airports.

No Hidden Magenta wonders if Europe is heading for its own Roe vs Wade.

Australian and Quebec will gain their first saints on October 17 (video).

Cardinal Francis George of Chicago will speak at Brigham Young University tomorrow on the topic “Catholics and Latter-day Saints: Partners in the Defence of Religious Freedom”.

A Marian statue damaged during the atomic bombing of Nagasaki will meet its counterpart in Guernica as part of a “peace pilgrimage” marking the 65th anniversary of the bombing.

America magazine examines the trends in the latest Annuario Pontificio and Rocco Palmo notes that the Catholic Church in America is still growing.

Robbers have shot dead a priest in Mexico.

The BBC reports that a monastery near Vienna is offering men the chance to “be a monk for a weekend“.

Bishop Thomas Tobin of Providence, Rhode Island, asks whether John Paul II was “crazy or holy“.

Zenit meets the Polish twin brothers who both felt called to the priesthood in the Salesian order.

And Da Mihi Animas marvels at the skills of the skateboarding friar (video).

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

The Equality Bill continues to provoke debate. Martin Salter MP has apologised for calling the Pope “a bloke in a dress”. E Jane Dickson says that if she were the Pope, she wouldn’t quote Aristotle. Jonathan Chaplin, Jonathan Oliver and Peter Hitchens defend the Pontiff. And the Christian Science Monitor offers an interesting summary of the debate from across the pond.

The Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, has implied that Anglicans accepting the Pope’s offer will not be “truly converted Roman Catholics”.

Church of Scotland ministers are not happy with Pope Benedict’s address to the Scottish bishops.

Jeff Israely of Time says Pope Benedict XVI will bring a tough message to Britain in September.

Bishop Bernard Fellay, the superior general of the SSPX, has said that reaching agreement with the Holy See is not possible “in human terms”.

German Mariologist Manfred Hauke suggests that the alleged messages of the Virgin Mary at Medjugorje “contain elements that speak clearly against a supernatural origin of the phenomenon”.

Catholic business executives have honoured the pro-life work of George W Bush, to the irritation of John Gehring of Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good.

The Brazilian landowner accused of ordering the murder of American nun Dorothy Stang is back in jail.

Two American street preachers have been shot and killed by a teenager who apparently opposed their message.

Fr Mauro Gagliardi’s commentary on the Lectionary and Liturgy of the Word in the two forms of the Roman Rite is now available in English.

The official website of the Newman Cause hails the decision of the Bishops of England and Wales to end their ad limina visit with Mass in the church where John Henry Newman was ordained a Catholic priest.

John Allen awards Cardinal George Pell the title of number one “rumour magnet” in the Catholic Church and defends the use of the term “Taliban Catholicism” (to the consternation of Jimmy Akin).

Max Hastings says legalised assisted suicide would be “a path to barbarity“.

On the Commonweal website, Eric Bugyis suggests that calls for “civility” are just a way of closing down debate.

And an atheist preacher has been allowed to stay in office after a court ruled that his views did not differ fundamentally from those of liberal theologians in the Protestant Church of the Netherlands.

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

Rocco Palmo reports on a growing clerical backlash against Archbishop Diarmuid Martin of Dublin.

Cardinal Franc Rodé, prefect of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life, sees a “crisis” among religious orders today.

The Vatican is preparing a new document on lay brothers.

Auxiliary Bishop Peter Elliott of Melbourne, a former Anglo-Catholic, assesses the Pope’s outreach to Anglicans (Christian Campbell responds).

Vatican Cardinal Paul Cordes offers a guide to the Pope’s Lenten message (full text of message here).

Pope Benedict has given his blessing to participants in this year’s
Winter Olympics.

The Pontifical Sistine Choir is looking for new singers.

No Hidden Magenta considers the impact of a “bioethics bombshell“.

CNN profiles a Mexican priest on the front line in the drug wars in Ciudad Juarez.

Catholics at Catholic colleges less likely to stray from the Church, a study has found.

Tom Hoopes says recent deaths have left a “Catholic greatness void”.

Blogger Paulinus unveils a cunning plan to thwart the National Secular Society.

Fr Dwight Longenecker has an epiphany while celebrating Mass.

Fr James Martin SJ reveals that he has a knack for guessing Oscar winners.

Michael Sean Winters is revolted by the National Prayer Breakfast.

And Cranmer imagines what an American pope might look like.

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

Caritas has launched an ambitious campaign, Zero Poverty, aimed at completely eradicating child poverty (official website here).

Douglas Alexander, Britain’s Secretary of State for International Development, has personally thanked Pope Benedict XVI for his urgent appeal for Haiti.

The head of the Legion of Christ has urged members of the embattled congregation to be charitable towards one another.

Yesterday the Pope received seven more English and Welsh bishops on their ad limina visit to Rome.

Cardinal Walter Kasper has clashed with the head of Germany’s Evangelical Federation, the EKD, over Pope Benedict.

Thomas Peters offers more details about the next Archbishop of Los Angeles.

Archbishop Charles Chaput of Denver says America’s high divorce rate is a sign of Satan’s continuing activity.

George Weigel hails the “pro-life, pro-marriage” environmentalism of Pope Benedict XVI.

Rocco Palmo wonders when the Pope will bring the College of Cardinals back up to its full voting complement of 120.

Edward Pentin talks to Cardinal Peter Turkson, the most senior African in the Roman Curia.

Villanova University has finished photographing St Peter’s Basilica in order to create a breathtaking virtual tour.

Sandro Magister asks why priests are supporting an adversary of the Church in a local Italian election.

Michèle Nuzzo-Naglieri profiles the priests and bishops who are already responding to the Pope’s call to evangelise the web.

New Atheist Christopher Hitchens is becoming the bane of liberal Christians.

Vivificat ponders the leaked outline of the Catholic-Orthodox discussion on papal primacy.

Headline Bistro examines the controversy over the pro-life advertisement that will be broadcast during the Superbowl.

Fr Anthony Chadwick speculates on the shape of the liturgy in the future Personal Ordinariates.

The proceedings of a major conference on “Christian Realism and Public Life: Catholic and Protestant Perspectives” at the University of St Thomas are now online (audio and video).

And Patrick Madrid explains how you can pray the Our Father with Pope Pius XII (audio).

Morning Catholic must-reads

leave a comment »

Photo: Benedict XVI is seen during his visit to Rome’s synagogue yesterday (AP Photo/ Osservatore Romano, Ho)

This is what Pope Benedict XVI said during his visit to Rome’s Great Synagogue yesterday. John Allen provides analysis, while the New York Times asks whether Pius XII was a saint.

Archbishop John Hepworth, Primate of the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC), has released details of his correspondence with Cardinal William Levada, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, concerning Anglicanorum coetibus, and says the TAC will respond formally to the Pope’s offer at Eastertide.

Meanwhile, America magazine has named the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, the winner of its Campion Award.

Cardinal Christoph Schönborn has issued a qualified apology to Bishop Ratko Perić of Mostar-Duvno following his controversial visit to Medjugorje.

The New York Times reports on yesterday’s Mass outside Port-au-Prince’s ruined cathedral. Meanwhile, Richard Dawkins doesn’t want believers to get the credit for helping Haitians following the devastating earthquake.

Cardinal Roger Etchegaray has finally left hospital after breaking his hip in the Midnight Mass incident in St Peter’s Basilica.

Peter Steinfels pays tribute to the late theologian Edward Schillebeeckx.

Charlotte Allen argues that, following the deaths of Schillebeeckx and Mary Daly, the flame of Catholic dissent is dying out.

The University of Notre Dame is once again at the centre of controversy after its student-run newspaper published an anti-gay cartoon.

Michael Sean-Winters challenges Archbishop Raymond Burke’s assessment of America (the archbishop’s full homily is here).

Pastor in Valle says Pope Benedict has transformed Rome.

You can find out what the Pope is doing for the next three months here.

And Fr Dwight Longenecker explains why Catholic churches should be tall.