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A new home for Morning Catholic Must-Reads

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From today, Morning Catholic Must-Reads has a new home on The Catholic Herald’s new website.

Thank you for reading the blog here. I look forward to seeing you over at CatholicHerald.co.uk.

Written by Luke Coppen

July 2, 2010 at 11:08 am

In the paper this week

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This week’s issue is the biggest of the year. It’s a 36-page double issue covering Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.

It’s hard to pick out the highlights, but I should mention Amy Welborn’s piece on Pope Benedict and the Christ Child, George Weigel on the Second Coming, Abbot Aidan Bellenger of Downside on the Real Presence and the “real absence”, Hollywood actor Gabriel Byrne on confession and psychoanalysis, Fr Aidan Nichols OP on whether the post-conciliar Church is truly the Church of Tradition and our indepth review of the year.

This is, of course, just a snapshot of what’s in the paper. To enjoy the full picture, you can pick up a copy at the back of Catholic churches in Britain and Ireland or subscribe here.

Written by Luke Coppen

December 23, 2009 at 4:57 pm

In the paper this week

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In this week’s paper we report on the reaction to the horrific murder of Irish missionary Fr Jeremiah Roche.

Cardinal George Pell has fun at the expense of “Green extremists”. Pope Benedict says it’s useless to condemn and complain. The Birmingham Oratory experiences a shake-up. And Cardinal Bertone appeals for religious freedom in the Muslim world.

Fr Ernesto Cardenal, the Nicaraguan poet-priest, tells us that he’s still living dangerously. Anna Arco offers an update on the Visitation of American religious Sisters. And Russell Sparkes tells the story of the Catholic woman who was nearly named Poet Laureate.

Jill Segger asks us to be quiet. Mary Wakefield explains how to make an atheist’s top lip quiver. And Mary Kenny says true Christians should hang out with “losers”.

Alan Caine is awed by the V&A’s new galleries. Michael White marvels at “the new Glenn Gould”. And Jonathan Wright admires two women saints who broke all the rules.

Finally, Stuart Reid wonders if you say Mass, Marce, Morce – or possibly even Mawss.

Our pressing Christmas deadlines mean that these items will not be uploaded on our website until next Tuesday. So why not dash out to your nearest Catholic church (in Britain and Ireland) and pick up a copy? Or you may like to subscribe here.

What’s in The Catholic Herald this week

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In this week’s paper we report on the clash between Harriet Harman and the bishops of England and Wales over the Equality Bill, the installation of the popular new Archbishop of Birmingham and Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor’s decision to reject a seat in the House of Lords.

We also interview the son of St Gianna Beretta Molla, publish a robust defence of Anglo-Catholic “patrimony” and present a forceful appeal for a sharper divide between the roles of clergy and lay people.

This is just a hint of what’s in the paper. To get the whole story, you may like to pick up a copy (at the back of churches in Britain and Ireland) or subscribe.

In the paper this week

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In this week’s issue, Andrew M Brown challenges Keir Starmer, Director of Public Prosecutions, over his guidelines on assisted suicide. Dennis Sewell examines the deadly impact of Darwin’s followers. Mark Dowd wonders why devout Catholics happily ignore Pope Benedict XVI on the environment. Angelo Stagnaro explains why the European Union owes a debt to the Virgin Mary, and I interview Bishop William Kenney, CP, the administrator of Birmingham archdiocese.

Hugh David applauds as a another myth about faith schools crumbles. Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith traces the origins of English anti-popery. Will Heaven wonders why no one is defending the traditional family and Nick Thomas feels betrayed by a musical hero.

David V Barrett explains why obsessives are attracted to the Templars. Francis Phillips hails a revisionist study of the Gunpowder Plot and Stuart Reid discovers how hard it is to practise the corporal works of mercy.

This is only a small part of this week’s paper. You may like to pick up a copy (at the back of Catholic churches in Britain and Ireland) or subscribe here.

In the paper this week

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This week’s issue is something of a first for us: for the first time in our history we’ve produced a magazine-sized supplement. This 20-page addition to the paper contains articles for Advent by Pastor Iuventus, Fr Rupert McHardy, Fr Tim Gardner, Fr Alexander Lucie-Smith and Alan Bancroft (who translated the poems of St Thérèse of Lisieux into English). The magazine isn’t available online, so if you live in Britain or Ireland you may like to pick up a copy at the back of your local Catholic church or subscribe to the paper.

Meanwhile, the rest of the paper is teeming with news, features and comment. We report on the latest developments in the plans for Pope Benedict’s visit to Britain, on a searing speech on contemporary arts by Archbishop Mario Conti of Glasgow and the clash over assisted suicide between the Bishops of England and Wales and the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Freddy Gray profiles the liberal American nuns who have convoked “Vatican III”. The novelist Rachel Billington explains why she’s following in the footsteps of her father, the prison reformer Lord Longford. Gerard Carruthers shows that the poet Robert Burns was friendly towards Catholics. Sophie Caledcott explains why girls around the world are swooning over Edward Cullen, the chaste hero of the Twilight series. Andrew McKie applauds Vatican astronomers for discussing the possibility of alien life and Jonathan Wright gives a B+ to a new study of St Thomas Aquinas.

This is just a taster. For the full experience, visit your local church or click here.

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Written by Luke Coppen

November 27, 2009 at 9:01 am

In the paper this week

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In this week’s issue leading Catholic blogger Fr John Zuhlsdorf explains why every diocese in the world should have a vicar for online ministry. Edward Pentin profiles the “black nobility” of Rome and agnostic Heide Hanford explains how she coped when her daughter decided to become a Catholic nun.

Harvard political philosopher Michael Sandel tells Greg Watts that the Church should have a role in the public square. Paul Hurley, SVD, explains why Oscar Wilde longed to be a Catholic. Andrew M Brown admires the Coen brothers’ story of a modern-day Job, A Serious Man. Petroc Trelawny savours a biography of Catholic convert James Lees-Milne and Brian Welter applauds a perceptive new study of Pope Benedict’s theology.

Stuart Reid calls for a dramatic reduction in extraordinary ministers of Holy Communion and Pastor Iuventus despairs at some Catholics’ consumerist approach to the faith.

Only a small proportion of the articles will go online tomorrow. You may like to consider taking out a subscription so you don’t miss out.

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Written by Luke Coppen

November 19, 2009 at 3:27 pm